question-icon

What does the following cervical spine MRI report suggest?

default
Posted on Fri, 5 Feb 2016
Question: MRI of the cervical spine. Coronal myelogram.
There are signal intensity changes at the C5/C6 and C6/C7 interverterbral discs indicating degenerative disease. There is a disc-osteophyte complex at the C5/C6 and C6/C7 intervertebral level. This cause indentation of the thecal sac, from anteriorly at this level. The neural foramen and exiting nerve roots are however spared. The cervical spinal cord is normal. The vertebrae and facet joints are normal. No evidence of basilar invagination. Impression: 1. Disc-osteophyte complexes at C5/C6 and C6/C7 without nerve impingement 2. Cervical spondylosis.
doctor
Answered by Dr. Vivek Chail (2 hours later)
Brief Answer:
Mild degenerative changes are there in cervical spine

Detailed Answer:
Hi XXXX
Thanks for writing in to us.

I have read through your query in detail.
Please find my observations below.

1. The cervical spine consists of 7 small bones aligned on top of each other. In between 2 bones there is a soft structure which is spongy called disc. The nerves originate in the spinal cord and come out through small foramen between 2 bones at the level of the discs.

2. Your MRI scan reports show that there are changes seen in the cervical spine vertebrae and discs between them at C 5 - C 6 and C 6 - C 7 levels. This is causing mild pressure on the covering of the spinal cord. The changes are of degenerative and this is mentioned as disc osteophyte complex.

3. The nerve roots in the foramina are normal and there is no pressure due to the disc changes. The spinal cord is normal.

In conclusion, you have mild degenerative changes in your neck spine. Physiotherapy and observing good posture will reduce your pain. Steroid and tramadol is usually not required in every patient with these changes however your doctor will discuss this after clinical examination. Avoid sudden neck movements and lifting weights.

Hope your query is answered.
Please do write back if you have any doubts.

Regards,
Above answer was peer-reviewed by : Dr. Chakravarthy Mazumdar
doctor
default
Follow up: Dr. Vivek Chail (4 hours later)
I was given steroid injection at the back of my neck and was prescribed with Tramadol 50 mg (1 capsule 2 times a day).

However the pain on my upper left arm, the numbness at the back my left hand and the tingling sensation on my thumb and index fingers though reduced but not completely gone. I could not sleep on my back as it gives excruciating pain on my upper left arm. Hence I have to sleep on my ride side all the time. Any other sleeping position will trigger pain in my upper left arm. Do I need to increase the dosage of Tramadol (from 1 capsule to 2 capsule) or is there any other stronger painkiller I should take.
doctor
Answered by Dr. Vivek Chail (8 minutes later)
Brief Answer:
For pain you can discuss about pregabalin with your doctor

Detailed Answer:
Hi XXXX,
Thanks for writing back with an update.

1. It is probable that the nerves get pinched in few positions including when you sleep on your back. This can be solved to some extent by physiotherapy. Tramadol is a good medicine and if you are feeling better then continue same dose for some time. If the pain does not show significant improvement then you can discuss about pregabalin which is a good nerve pain relief medicine with your doctor. However there are some side effects with pregabalin like increased sleepiness.

Hope your query is answered.
Please do write back if you have any doubts.

Regards,
Above answer was peer-reviewed by : Dr. Chakravarthy Mazumdar
doctor
default
Follow up: Dr. Vivek Chail (2 days later)
I have 3 questions

1. I am diagnosed with cervical spondylosis w osteophytes at verterbral end plates of c5/c6 and c6/c7 indenting the thecal sac. How do i reduce the growth of these osteophytes over time to prevent the bone spur from further pressing the thecal sac.

2. I am also having cervical lordosis. Can this be resolved thru traction.

3. With the injection of steroid on my neck, I am now feeling better with only mild pain on my upper arm. I am an avid scuba diver. Can I continue w my scuba diving with this condition.



doctor
Answered by Dr. Vivek Chail (4 hours later)
Brief Answer:
The osteophyte formation can be delayed with reduced wear and tear of bones

Detailed Answer:
Hi XXXX,
Thanks for writing back with an update.

1. The osteophytes are degenerative changes and you are having it at an earlier age when compared to the population. This cannot be prevented but it can be delayed. The osteophytes form when there is inflammation to the ligaments and joints. The osteophyte growth can be controlled by slowing down inflammation in the neck spine. However it cannot be stopped.

2. I guess you mean that you have loss of cervical lordosis. This occurs when the muscles are in spasm. With traction and corrective exercises the loss of cervical lordosis can be treated.

3. Scuba diving is a form of water exercise and less stressful on your spondylosis. It is a form of therapy and will make you comfortable. Please continue scuba diving as long you feel comfortable.

Hope your query is answered.
Please do write back if you have any doubts.

Regards,
Above answer was peer-reviewed by : Dr. Chakravarthy Mazumdar
doctor
Answered by
Dr.
Dr. Vivek Chail

Radiologist

Practicing since :2002

Answered : 6783 Questions

premium_optimized

The User accepted the expert's answer

Share on
What does the following cervical spine MRI report suggest?

Brief Answer: Mild degenerative changes are there in cervical spine Detailed Answer: Hi XXXX Thanks for writing in to us. I have read through your query in detail. Please find my observations below. 1. The cervical spine consists of 7 small bones aligned on top of each other. In between 2 bones there is a soft structure which is spongy called disc. The nerves originate in the spinal cord and come out through small foramen between 2 bones at the level of the discs. 2. Your MRI scan reports show that there are changes seen in the cervical spine vertebrae and discs between them at C 5 - C 6 and C 6 - C 7 levels. This is causing mild pressure on the covering of the spinal cord. The changes are of degenerative and this is mentioned as disc osteophyte complex. 3. The nerve roots in the foramina are normal and there is no pressure due to the disc changes. The spinal cord is normal. In conclusion, you have mild degenerative changes in your neck spine. Physiotherapy and observing good posture will reduce your pain. Steroid and tramadol is usually not required in every patient with these changes however your doctor will discuss this after clinical examination. Avoid sudden neck movements and lifting weights. Hope your query is answered. Please do write back if you have any doubts. Regards,