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What does elevated tyrosine levels indicate?

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Posted on Thu, 26 May 2016
Question: What does elevated above normal tyrosine indicate?
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Answered by Dr. Shafi Ullah Khan (2 hours later)
Brief Answer:
tyrosinemia needs work up .

Detailed Answer:
Thank you for asking

i read your question and i understand your concern. Raised tyrosine levels also called tyrosinemia is an entity associated with multiple possibilities and need further screening. Raised phenylalanine levels should be ruled out as that will make it phenylketonuria. if not then other genetic disorders of tyrosinemia need to be worked up. At your age of 25, its likely benign entities of tyrosinemia which self resolve. Metabolic profile work up is mandatory here.

However last but not the least, sometimes mere proteinaceous diet can lead to slight raised tyrosine levels and may give such slight variations from normal. Also get evaluated for metanephrines levels and other pheo work up which i highly doubt as possibility and is unlikely in your case but still no harm in being on safer side. Meanwhile use low phenylalanine / tyrosine diet .

Nutshell, it needs a complete clinical correlation and thorough work up to sort it out. I hopeit helps. take good care of yourself and dont forget to close the discussion please.

regards
Khan
Above answer was peer-reviewed by : Dr. Chakravarthy Mazumdar
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Answered by
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Dr. Shafi Ullah Khan

General & Family Physician

Practicing since :2012

Answered : 3613 Questions

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What does elevated tyrosine levels indicate?

Brief Answer: tyrosinemia needs work up . Detailed Answer: Thank you for asking i read your question and i understand your concern. Raised tyrosine levels also called tyrosinemia is an entity associated with multiple possibilities and need further screening. Raised phenylalanine levels should be ruled out as that will make it phenylketonuria. if not then other genetic disorders of tyrosinemia need to be worked up. At your age of 25, its likely benign entities of tyrosinemia which self resolve. Metabolic profile work up is mandatory here. However last but not the least, sometimes mere proteinaceous diet can lead to slight raised tyrosine levels and may give such slight variations from normal. Also get evaluated for metanephrines levels and other pheo work up which i highly doubt as possibility and is unlikely in your case but still no harm in being on safer side. Meanwhile use low phenylalanine / tyrosine diet . Nutshell, it needs a complete clinical correlation and thorough work up to sort it out. I hopeit helps. take good care of yourself and dont forget to close the discussion please. regards Khan