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What do cholesterol levels of 189 and triglycerides of 107 indicate?

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Posted on Fri, 13 Oct 2017
Question: Hi Just had a blood test done I 'm a 63 year old male My Lipid Panel read as follows: Cholesterol Total 189. Triglycerides 107. HDL Cholesterol 63. VLDL Cholesterol 21. LDL Cholesterol Calc 105. I believe these numbers are good except for the LDL Cholesterol which might be high. Would like a proffessional opinion please,Thank you
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Answered by Dr. Bonnie Berger-Durnbaugh (34 minutes later)
Brief Answer:
Information

Detailed Answer:
Hello and welcome,

Let's go through each of these. Of course context is important in addressing lab tests, because if you have a family or personal history of cardiovascular disease, diabetes, smoke, high blood pressure, physically inactive, have an unhealthy diet or are overweight, then the lipid panel becomes more significant.

Total cholesterol 189:
It's desirable for this to be less than 200, so that is ok.

Triglycerides 107:
Also fine as desirable is less than 150

HDL 63:
We like to see this being over 60, so this is ok.

VLDL (very low density lipoproteins) is used in the older formula for calculating "calculated LDL" but in itself is not that useful as it contains a diverse group of particles. VLDL is calculated by dividing the triglyceride value by 5 (107/5 =21).

Calculated LDL 105:
this is considered "near/above optimal" with optimal being 100 or less. Your's is so close to normal I wouldn't make much of it.

Here are the guidelines for treating elevated LDL according to the National Cholesterol Education Panel (NCEP):
"If a person has LDL-C above the target values, they will be treated.
The target LDL-C value is:

Less than 100 mg/dL (2.59 mmol/L) if the person has heart disease or diabetes [and ideally less than 70 mg/dL (1.81 mmol/L)]
Less than 130 mg/dL (3.37 mmol/L) if the person has 2 or more risk factors
Less than 160 mg/dL (4.14 mmol/L) if the person has 0 or 1 risk factor

Risk factors are:
Cigarette smoking
Being overweight or obese
Unhealthy diet
Being physically inactive—not getting enough exercise
Age (if you are a male 45 years or older or a female 50-55 years or older)
Hypertension (blood pressure of 140/90 or higher or taking high blood pressure medications)
Family history of premature heart disease (heart disease in a first degree male relative under age 55 or a first degree female relative under age 65)
Pre-existing heart disease or already having had a heart attack
Diabetes or prediabetes
Note: High HDL (60 mg/dL or above) is considered a 'negative risk factor' and its presence allows the removal of one risk factor from the total."

If you do not have significant risk factors for cardiovascular disease, then I would not make much of your having an LDL of 105, but I will defer to your physician and you who know more about your medical history.

I hope this information helps.


Above answer was peer-reviewed by : Dr. Chakravarthy Mazumdar
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Answered by
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Dr. Bonnie Berger-Durnbaugh

General & Family Physician

Practicing since :1991

Answered : 3138 Questions

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What do cholesterol levels of 189 and triglycerides of 107 indicate?

Brief Answer: Information Detailed Answer: Hello and welcome, Let's go through each of these. Of course context is important in addressing lab tests, because if you have a family or personal history of cardiovascular disease, diabetes, smoke, high blood pressure, physically inactive, have an unhealthy diet or are overweight, then the lipid panel becomes more significant. Total cholesterol 189: It's desirable for this to be less than 200, so that is ok. Triglycerides 107: Also fine as desirable is less than 150 HDL 63: We like to see this being over 60, so this is ok. VLDL (very low density lipoproteins) is used in the older formula for calculating "calculated LDL" but in itself is not that useful as it contains a diverse group of particles. VLDL is calculated by dividing the triglyceride value by 5 (107/5 =21). Calculated LDL 105: this is considered "near/above optimal" with optimal being 100 or less. Your's is so close to normal I wouldn't make much of it. Here are the guidelines for treating elevated LDL according to the National Cholesterol Education Panel (NCEP): "If a person has LDL-C above the target values, they will be treated. The target LDL-C value is: Less than 100 mg/dL (2.59 mmol/L) if the person has heart disease or diabetes [and ideally less than 70 mg/dL (1.81 mmol/L)] Less than 130 mg/dL (3.37 mmol/L) if the person has 2 or more risk factors Less than 160 mg/dL (4.14 mmol/L) if the person has 0 or 1 risk factor Risk factors are: Cigarette smoking Being overweight or obese Unhealthy diet Being physically inactive—not getting enough exercise Age (if you are a male 45 years or older or a female 50-55 years or older) Hypertension (blood pressure of 140/90 or higher or taking high blood pressure medications) Family history of premature heart disease (heart disease in a first degree male relative under age 55 or a first degree female relative under age 65) Pre-existing heart disease or already having had a heart attack Diabetes or prediabetes Note: High HDL (60 mg/dL or above) is considered a 'negative risk factor' and its presence allows the removal of one risk factor from the total." If you do not have significant risk factors for cardiovascular disease, then I would not make much of your having an LDL of 105, but I will defer to your physician and you who know more about your medical history. I hope this information helps.