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What causes tingling sensation and numbness in the legs?

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Posted on Wed, 19 Oct 2016
Question: Hello, my wife is experiencing tingling and numbness in her lower body (waist down). We went to the ER and had an MRI which revealed no spinal damage or issues and we are waiting to see a neurologist. Is there anything I can do in the meantime?
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Answered by Dr. Dariush Saghafi (48 minutes later)
Brief Answer:
Await appointment with neurologist but stay vigilant

Detailed Answer:
Good afternoon and I'm sorry that you're wife is having these complications. The fact that you've visited an ER and they actually did an MRI tells me that in all likelihood they were looking for the most serious types of problems that would require IMMEDIATE and/or AGGRESSIVE care such as stroke, bleed, or presence of a tumor, abscess/infection, etc.

Since they did not see any of those things they felt comfortable discharging her to home with the recommendation that she a neurologist. I believe this is a reasonable course of action and would imply that the best thing that you and your wife can do would be to simply be vigilant for any changes that may occur in her condition but otherwise there's nothing else "to do" until further tests (especially the neurological examination by the neurologist) can be done.

If changes begin occurring in her ability to move the feet and legs or if things progress for any reason above the waist to the hands and arms or if her ability to urinate or have bowel movements becomes altered from normal then, you may be justified in returning to the ER but if things stay status quo you have time to wait and see the neurologist.

They will need to physically examine her in order to determine the next best course of action to take in terms of testing. My guess is that they will consider doing blood work as well as an MRI of the brain. An electrical study MAY be possible in this case but I would first check bloodwork and an MRI of the brain before doing anything else.

If I've adequately answered your questions could you do me a huge favor by CLOSING THE QUERY and being sure to include some fine words of feedback along with a 5 STAR rating if you feel my answers/suggestions have helped? Again, many thanks for posing your questions and please let me know how things turn out.

Do not forget to contact me in the future at: www.bit.ly/drdariushsaghafi for additional questions, comments, or concerns having to do with this topic or others.

This query has utilized a total of 21 minutes of professional time in research, review, and synthesis for the purpose of formulating a return statement.
Above answer was peer-reviewed by : Dr. Chakravarthy Mazumdar
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Answered by
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Dr. Dariush Saghafi

Neurologist

Practicing since :1988

Answered : 2473 Questions

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What causes tingling sensation and numbness in the legs?

Brief Answer: Await appointment with neurologist but stay vigilant Detailed Answer: Good afternoon and I'm sorry that you're wife is having these complications. The fact that you've visited an ER and they actually did an MRI tells me that in all likelihood they were looking for the most serious types of problems that would require IMMEDIATE and/or AGGRESSIVE care such as stroke, bleed, or presence of a tumor, abscess/infection, etc. Since they did not see any of those things they felt comfortable discharging her to home with the recommendation that she a neurologist. I believe this is a reasonable course of action and would imply that the best thing that you and your wife can do would be to simply be vigilant for any changes that may occur in her condition but otherwise there's nothing else "to do" until further tests (especially the neurological examination by the neurologist) can be done. If changes begin occurring in her ability to move the feet and legs or if things progress for any reason above the waist to the hands and arms or if her ability to urinate or have bowel movements becomes altered from normal then, you may be justified in returning to the ER but if things stay status quo you have time to wait and see the neurologist. They will need to physically examine her in order to determine the next best course of action to take in terms of testing. My guess is that they will consider doing blood work as well as an MRI of the brain. An electrical study MAY be possible in this case but I would first check bloodwork and an MRI of the brain before doing anything else. If I've adequately answered your questions could you do me a huge favor by CLOSING THE QUERY and being sure to include some fine words of feedback along with a 5 STAR rating if you feel my answers/suggestions have helped? Again, many thanks for posing your questions and please let me know how things turn out. Do not forget to contact me in the future at: www.bit.ly/drdariushsaghafi for additional questions, comments, or concerns having to do with this topic or others. This query has utilized a total of 21 minutes of professional time in research, review, and synthesis for the purpose of formulating a return statement.