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What causes thick clear fluid oozing from wound in a patient with diabetes?

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Posted on Mon, 18 May 2015
Question: My friend is a diabetic, He is 65 years of age, and while in XXXXXXX he had to have part of his left second toes removed on one side, meaning nail removed incision made, gang green and affected tissue removed, and sewn back up. This has been a little more than 4 weeks ago. Today he tells me, that a thick clear fluid with bubbles in the fluid was oozing. What can this mean?
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Answered by Dr. Binu Parameswaran Pillai (1 hour later)
Brief Answer:
Serum or infection

Detailed Answer:
Good day,
Noted your concern.
The thick clear fluid could be an oozing of serum from wound. However, a direct inspection of wound is required to rule out an infection. Bubbles could be due to air escape from the joints or due to infection. Is there pain at the wound site ? Any fever? Any colour change in wound site? You have not mentioned if the blood supply in his legs were good or not. That is very important to assess further. If the blood supply is compromised, we need to be extremely cautious. It is wiser not to move the affected toes ( Offloading). Do you have a photo of the wound which can be attached to this question?
Above answer was peer-reviewed by : Dr. Chakravarthy Mazumdar
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Answered by
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Dr. Binu Parameswaran Pillai

Endocrinologist

Practicing since :2003

Answered : 1435 Questions

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What causes thick clear fluid oozing from wound in a patient with diabetes?

Brief Answer: Serum or infection Detailed Answer: Good day, Noted your concern. The thick clear fluid could be an oozing of serum from wound. However, a direct inspection of wound is required to rule out an infection. Bubbles could be due to air escape from the joints or due to infection. Is there pain at the wound site ? Any fever? Any colour change in wound site? You have not mentioned if the blood supply in his legs were good or not. That is very important to assess further. If the blood supply is compromised, we need to be extremely cautious. It is wiser not to move the affected toes ( Offloading). Do you have a photo of the wound which can be attached to this question?