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What causes severe weakness, tremors and fluctuations in body temperature?

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Posted on Sat, 20 Dec 2014
Question: I have a 4.0cm Meningioma in my right frontal lobe. I've been holding off on surgery as Mayo Clinic agreed. Both Mayo Clinic and XXXXXXX U agreed it is benign.
I have had 2 episodes of severe weakness, tremors, and fluctuations of body temperature from 94.6 to 97.9.
I started out with a slight fever for two days. I stayed in bed for 6 weeks, too weak to stay up. The first episode was in January this year, and the last episode started Oct 7th this year and lasted till November 15th. Do you think this is in any way related to the brain tumor? My medical doctor had no idea. Within the last six months the tumor has grown from 3.8 by 3.2 to 4.0 by 3.4. Also, my short term memory is leaving me. I can pick up the computer to do something and forget what. I think of something I need to do right away and before I can do it, it leaves my mind. I have a slight ache on the right side of my head that comes and goes, but not really painful. It appears the right side of my head is slightly swollen, and it is definitely a little tender to the touch. I am so scared of brain surgery as I worked in a nursing home and saw some horrible results of such. Please give your opinion.
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Answered by Dr. Monish De (37 minutes later)
Brief Answer:
Craniotomy surgery is the treatment of choice

Detailed Answer:
Hi

I have gone through your history.

About 85% of meningiomas are benign, non cancerous, slow growing tumors.

Since you are having tremors and short term memory loss i would advise you to go for surgery.

Meningiomas can often be removed entirely with surgery and it is a very safe procedure.

If a meningioma is benign and in a part of the brain where neurosurgeons can safely completely remove it, surgery is likely to be the only treatment needed.

For some total resection surgery is all that is needed for treatment, followed by periodic imaging to monitor any recurrence of a tumor.

The most common type of surgery to remove a meningioma is called a craniotomy.

This procedure involves making an incision in the scalp and removing a piece of bone from the skull.

The neurosurgeon can then access and remove the tumor, or as much of the tumor as possible without risk of severe damage to the brain.

The neurosurgeon then replaces the bone and closes the incision.

Benign meningiomas have the highest survival rate.

Regards

DR DE
Above answer was peer-reviewed by : Dr. Raju A.T
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Follow up: Dr. Monish De (51 minutes later)
Thank you for your quick response. You didn't say whether the temperature fluctuations and the severe weakness (including shallow breathing) is tumor related. The two episodes I've had this year were quite scary.
doctor
Answered by Dr. Monish De (8 minutes later)
Brief Answer:
Shallow breathing is tumour related

Detailed Answer:
Hi

The temperature fluctuations are not tumour related.

You may had some infection in your body which had caused it.

Severe weakness including shallow breathing is tumour related and i would advise you to go for surgery at the earliest.

If you have no more clarifications then please rate the answer and close the thread.

Regards

DR DE
Above answer was peer-reviewed by : Dr. Vinay Bhardwaj
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Answered by
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Dr. Monish De

Oncologist

Practicing since :2004

Answered : 2231 Questions

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What causes severe weakness, tremors and fluctuations in body temperature?

Brief Answer: Craniotomy surgery is the treatment of choice Detailed Answer: Hi I have gone through your history. About 85% of meningiomas are benign, non cancerous, slow growing tumors. Since you are having tremors and short term memory loss i would advise you to go for surgery. Meningiomas can often be removed entirely with surgery and it is a very safe procedure. If a meningioma is benign and in a part of the brain where neurosurgeons can safely completely remove it, surgery is likely to be the only treatment needed. For some total resection surgery is all that is needed for treatment, followed by periodic imaging to monitor any recurrence of a tumor. The most common type of surgery to remove a meningioma is called a craniotomy. This procedure involves making an incision in the scalp and removing a piece of bone from the skull. The neurosurgeon can then access and remove the tumor, or as much of the tumor as possible without risk of severe damage to the brain. The neurosurgeon then replaces the bone and closes the incision. Benign meningiomas have the highest survival rate. Regards DR DE