question-icon

What causes severe muscle aches in upper arms and legs?

default
Posted on Tue, 24 May 2016
Question: I am experiencing muscle aches over all, but mainly in my upper arms and legs. Three weeks ago I had these same aches and suspected protein deficiency, since I do HIIT several times a week. After a week of that I came down with stomach flu - about 12 hours of intense cramps and vomiting. I also had a low fever. Then the stomach pain continued for four days during which I could not eat at all and managed to just sip about a pint of water per day. Even the water was very painful. After that I started food again, beginning with broths and jello. The muscle aches disappeared during the stomach pain period, but then returned. Now It is just the muscle pains - in my arms it resembles tendonitis which I had years ago.
doctor
Answered by Dr. Neel Kudchadkar (2 hours later)
Brief Answer:
Myalgia caused by HIIT exercise workouts - No pain, No gain.

Detailed Answer:
Dear XXXXX,

I have examined your question rather carefully. You mention that you do HIIT, which is a new regimen of high intensity workouts, right? I congratulate you for being so fitness oriented, indeed.

I have kept in mind the "stomach flu" that you mention having occurred in between.

We have broad possibilities,

First, it's quite well known that infections can indeed lead to "myalgia" - meaning the sort of muscular pains that you experience. Particularly, in the post infective stage of recovery. This is not due to the germs, but due to your bodies defence mechanism of fever to fight the germs- that needs high energy levels to maintain. The medical term is rhabdomyolysis. - This means breakdown of muscle tissue and protein to supply energy to your immune system to fight off the germs - regardless of whether medication is taken or not.

There you have a splendid explanation for the second bout of myalgia.

As for idiopathic myalgia experienced in the limbs regularly, well, we know that the slogan for any form of exercise - body building, isometrics, aerobics and HIIT - is "no pain, no gain".

And I assure you that HIIT is indeed exercise that pushes one's body over the top. HIIT gives results. However, muscle pain is a natural outcome.

I encourage most of my patients with similar problems to slightly change their exercise techniques, yet to keep up with the goals of exercise.

Given the nature of events, I suggest that you see a local doctor to ask for a medicine that probably may not require a prescription, in most places, called as serratiopeptidase. Most of my athletic patients find that this greatly helps. I strongly would request you to avoid over the counter medicines like Advil or Tylenol for the muscle pain, though they do work, for the simple reason that you might need to take them regularly, and seriously speaking, they have side effects - for example - Tylenol is bad for your liver.

Please steer clear of NSAID pain killers too.

Muscle pain is a good sign that your HIIT workouts are indeed working to keep you in perfect fitness. I am certain that as you put in the sweat, the muscle pains will vanish and subside as your body grows stronger.

You might also want to ask your HIIT trainer as regards this line of thinking. I am certain that he or she would agree to this line of thinking.

Since, the fever has vanished, there is no reason to intervene medically, and indeed, I do see no link between tendonitis and these events.

I am certain that when your local doctor prescribes you a low dose of serratiopeptidase tablets, you'll immediately feel relief - from your main complaints - muscle pains - "myalgia"

I do encourage you to ask me any doubts or questions as regards such health issues.

It's been great knowing you,
Your sincerely,
Dr. Neel Kudchadkar
Above answer was peer-reviewed by : Dr. Naveen Kumar
doctor
Answered by
Dr.
Dr. Neel Kudchadkar

General & Family Physician

Practicing since :2004

Answered : 532 Questions

premium_optimized

The User accepted the expert's answer

Share on
What causes severe muscle aches in upper arms and legs?

Brief Answer: Myalgia caused by HIIT exercise workouts - No pain, No gain. Detailed Answer: Dear XXXXX, I have examined your question rather carefully. You mention that you do HIIT, which is a new regimen of high intensity workouts, right? I congratulate you for being so fitness oriented, indeed. I have kept in mind the "stomach flu" that you mention having occurred in between. We have broad possibilities, First, it's quite well known that infections can indeed lead to "myalgia" - meaning the sort of muscular pains that you experience. Particularly, in the post infective stage of recovery. This is not due to the germs, but due to your bodies defence mechanism of fever to fight the germs- that needs high energy levels to maintain. The medical term is rhabdomyolysis. - This means breakdown of muscle tissue and protein to supply energy to your immune system to fight off the germs - regardless of whether medication is taken or not. There you have a splendid explanation for the second bout of myalgia. As for idiopathic myalgia experienced in the limbs regularly, well, we know that the slogan for any form of exercise - body building, isometrics, aerobics and HIIT - is "no pain, no gain". And I assure you that HIIT is indeed exercise that pushes one's body over the top. HIIT gives results. However, muscle pain is a natural outcome. I encourage most of my patients with similar problems to slightly change their exercise techniques, yet to keep up with the goals of exercise. Given the nature of events, I suggest that you see a local doctor to ask for a medicine that probably may not require a prescription, in most places, called as serratiopeptidase. Most of my athletic patients find that this greatly helps. I strongly would request you to avoid over the counter medicines like Advil or Tylenol for the muscle pain, though they do work, for the simple reason that you might need to take them regularly, and seriously speaking, they have side effects - for example - Tylenol is bad for your liver. Please steer clear of NSAID pain killers too. Muscle pain is a good sign that your HIIT workouts are indeed working to keep you in perfect fitness. I am certain that as you put in the sweat, the muscle pains will vanish and subside as your body grows stronger. You might also want to ask your HIIT trainer as regards this line of thinking. I am certain that he or she would agree to this line of thinking. Since, the fever has vanished, there is no reason to intervene medically, and indeed, I do see no link between tendonitis and these events. I am certain that when your local doctor prescribes you a low dose of serratiopeptidase tablets, you'll immediately feel relief - from your main complaints - muscle pains - "myalgia" I do encourage you to ask me any doubts or questions as regards such health issues. It's been great knowing you, Your sincerely, Dr. Neel Kudchadkar