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What causes renal glycosuria?

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Posted on Mon, 25 Jul 2016
Question: I am 69, and had a urinalysis and it showed some slight sugar in there. My blood test showed 124 in glucose part of test. Is that risk for diabetes?
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Answered by Dr. Shehzad Topiwala (23 minutes later)
Brief Answer:
Urine glucose less relevant now

Detailed Answer:
The practice of urine glucose has been historically performed for many years in the past. However now it has little value, if any.

So you should go by your blood glucose levels only. If this blood sample was taken in the fasting state then this level is close to diabetes. It is called Pre diabetes.

Sorry to learn about your bothersome symptoms. When I see someone like you in my practice, I typically order the following blood tests in addition to a detailed physical examination:

CBC (Complete Blood Count, also known as Hemogram; includes Hemoglobin, WBC and Platelet counts)
Electrolytes (Sodium and Potassium in particular)
HbA1c (Glycosylated Hemoglobin = your last 3 months' glucose average). Also known by other names such as GlycoHemoglobin or Glycated Hemoglobin or A1c
Liver function tests (SGOT , SGPT, Albumin, Bilirubin, Alkaline Phosphatase)
Kidney function tests (BUN, Creatinine)
TSH (checks your thyroid)
25 hydroxy Vitamin D levels (ideal range 40 to 60 ng/ml = 100 to 150 nmol/liter)

None of these tests require any fasting and can be done at any time of the day
Above answer was peer-reviewed by : Dr. Chakravarthy Mazumdar
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Follow up: Dr. Shehzad Topiwala (1 hour later)
Doctor when that blood test was taken it was not fasting. I had eaten cereal and toast and coffee 2 hours earlier. sugar in coffee and jelly on toast. Does the fact that it was NOT fasting make a. difference??
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Answered by Dr. Shehzad Topiwala (8 hours later)
Brief Answer:
Follow up

Detailed Answer:
Yes. It means that your blood glucose sample is considered a non-fasting ie random one. The cut off for diabetes on a random sample is 200. So on this basis you do not have it. However, to be more confident in saying so. the HbA1c test is helpful.
Above answer was peer-reviewed by : Dr. Chakravarthy Mazumdar
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Answered by
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Dr. Shehzad Topiwala

Endocrinologist

Practicing since :2001

Answered : 1663 Questions

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What causes renal glycosuria?

Brief Answer: Urine glucose less relevant now Detailed Answer: The practice of urine glucose has been historically performed for many years in the past. However now it has little value, if any. So you should go by your blood glucose levels only. If this blood sample was taken in the fasting state then this level is close to diabetes. It is called Pre diabetes. Sorry to learn about your bothersome symptoms. When I see someone like you in my practice, I typically order the following blood tests in addition to a detailed physical examination: CBC (Complete Blood Count, also known as Hemogram; includes Hemoglobin, WBC and Platelet counts) Electrolytes (Sodium and Potassium in particular) HbA1c (Glycosylated Hemoglobin = your last 3 months' glucose average). Also known by other names such as GlycoHemoglobin or Glycated Hemoglobin or A1c Liver function tests (SGOT , SGPT, Albumin, Bilirubin, Alkaline Phosphatase) Kidney function tests (BUN, Creatinine) TSH (checks your thyroid) 25 hydroxy Vitamin D levels (ideal range 40 to 60 ng/ml = 100 to 150 nmol/liter) None of these tests require any fasting and can be done at any time of the day