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What causes posterior cerebral hemorrhage?

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Posted on Wed, 13 May 2015
Question: yes please, what is the outlook following a posterior cerebral hemorrhage?

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Answered by Dr. Kathy Robinson (55 minutes later)
Brief Answer:
it depends upon the extent of the bleeding

Detailed Answer:
Hello and thank you for your question.
Cerebral hemorrhages are very serious. About 50% of people die very soon after a hemorrhage. If people live past the initial few months then there is a good chance of recovery thought the process can take a long time, years.
Recovery depends upon the amount of bleeding, how much damage was done before the bleeding was stopped and the extent of therapy during the recovery period.
If the bleeding was not extensive then full recovery is usually possible. If the bleeding was very extensive or was present for a long time before bleeding was stopped then some recovery is usually possible but there is a likelihood of some residual damage. The type of residual damage depends upon the location of the bleeding, for example, if there was bleeding the speech centers then there may not be full recovery in the ability to speak. If bleeding was in movement centers then there may be residual weakness.
Careful follow up by neurologists and physical therapists gives the best chance for full recovery.
Watch this TED talk about a doctor who had a large bleed into her head. She made a full recovery but it took 8 years.
http://www.ted.com/talks/jill_bolte_taylor_s_powerful_stroke_of_insight
Regards,
Dr. Robinson
Above answer was peer-reviewed by : Dr. Vinay Bhardwaj
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Answered by
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Dr. Kathy Robinson

General & Family Physician

Practicing since :1989

Answered : 3535 Questions

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What causes posterior cerebral hemorrhage?

Brief Answer: it depends upon the extent of the bleeding Detailed Answer: Hello and thank you for your question. Cerebral hemorrhages are very serious. About 50% of people die very soon after a hemorrhage. If people live past the initial few months then there is a good chance of recovery thought the process can take a long time, years. Recovery depends upon the amount of bleeding, how much damage was done before the bleeding was stopped and the extent of therapy during the recovery period. If the bleeding was not extensive then full recovery is usually possible. If the bleeding was very extensive or was present for a long time before bleeding was stopped then some recovery is usually possible but there is a likelihood of some residual damage. The type of residual damage depends upon the location of the bleeding, for example, if there was bleeding the speech centers then there may not be full recovery in the ability to speak. If bleeding was in movement centers then there may be residual weakness. Careful follow up by neurologists and physical therapists gives the best chance for full recovery. Watch this TED talk about a doctor who had a large bleed into her head. She made a full recovery but it took 8 years. http://www.ted.com/talks/jill_bolte_taylor_s_powerful_stroke_of_insight Regards, Dr. Robinson