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What causes periodic electric shock like sensation?

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Posted on Tue, 26 Jul 2016
Question: Thank You very much. The symptom I'm feeling is every 5 to 10 minutes I get a feeling of a electric shock, a burst, I've checked my blood pressure and it's ok. Can you help

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Answered by Dr. Dariush Saghafi (2 hours later)
Brief Answer:
A little more information?

Detailed Answer:
Good evening. Thank you for posing your question on this network. I would love to help you as a neurologist who hears people talking about electric shocks all the time, however, it seems like you were in the middle of some sort of conversation with someone and perhaps they have more information on your condition because I can't access any other thread you've got going with any one.

I'll need a bit of a story to put this together some more for you, however, depending where this electric shock starts and ends I can tell you that it is usually representative of compressing a nerve root, putting traction on an entrapped nerve which could be held up on a degenerative disc, osteophyte, or other anomalous anatomic entity getting in the way of the smooth passage and trajectory of a nerve. Electric shocks that are intermittent also occur when electrical pathways in the brain or spinal cord are DEMYELINATED...or in lay terms, DENUDED/FRAYED...or otherwise, not properly INSULATED such that any low level stimulation will cause a sharp and spontaneous electrical BUZZ that can literally go from head to toe and stop people dead in their tracks from what they're doing.

I don't see what blood pressure could possibly have to do with this phenomenon....no matter whether it's high, super high, low, or somewhere in between. Blood pressure control or lack thereof should not initiate or be related to any phenomenon of neuropathy or myelopathy.

If I've satisfactorily addressed your question and you have nothing else to ask or add then, could you do me the kindest of favors by CLOSING THIS QUERY and be sure to include some fine words of feedback as to our transaction? Again, many thanks for posing your question. In the alternative, feel free to provide me with any other information and I'll be happy to swish it around inside my head to see if anything else pops out.

Do not forget to recontact me in the future at: www.bit.ly/drdariushsaghafi for additional questions, comments, or concerns having to do with this topic or others.

This query has utilized a total of 15 minutes of professional time in research, review, and synthesis for the purpose of formulating a return statement.
Above answer was peer-reviewed by : Dr. Chakravarthy Mazumdar
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Answered by
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Dr. Dariush Saghafi

Neurologist

Practicing since :1988

Answered : 2473 Questions

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What causes periodic electric shock like sensation?

Brief Answer: A little more information? Detailed Answer: Good evening. Thank you for posing your question on this network. I would love to help you as a neurologist who hears people talking about electric shocks all the time, however, it seems like you were in the middle of some sort of conversation with someone and perhaps they have more information on your condition because I can't access any other thread you've got going with any one. I'll need a bit of a story to put this together some more for you, however, depending where this electric shock starts and ends I can tell you that it is usually representative of compressing a nerve root, putting traction on an entrapped nerve which could be held up on a degenerative disc, osteophyte, or other anomalous anatomic entity getting in the way of the smooth passage and trajectory of a nerve. Electric shocks that are intermittent also occur when electrical pathways in the brain or spinal cord are DEMYELINATED...or in lay terms, DENUDED/FRAYED...or otherwise, not properly INSULATED such that any low level stimulation will cause a sharp and spontaneous electrical BUZZ that can literally go from head to toe and stop people dead in their tracks from what they're doing. I don't see what blood pressure could possibly have to do with this phenomenon....no matter whether it's high, super high, low, or somewhere in between. Blood pressure control or lack thereof should not initiate or be related to any phenomenon of neuropathy or myelopathy. If I've satisfactorily addressed your question and you have nothing else to ask or add then, could you do me the kindest of favors by CLOSING THIS QUERY and be sure to include some fine words of feedback as to our transaction? Again, many thanks for posing your question. In the alternative, feel free to provide me with any other information and I'll be happy to swish it around inside my head to see if anything else pops out. Do not forget to recontact me in the future at: www.bit.ly/drdariushsaghafi for additional questions, comments, or concerns having to do with this topic or others. This query has utilized a total of 15 minutes of professional time in research, review, and synthesis for the purpose of formulating a return statement.