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What causes momentary loss of consciousness in a diabetic with COPD?

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Posted on Wed, 19 Sep 2018
Question: instantaneous momentary loss of consciousness,no amount of sleep changes this, use c- pap every night, on inhalation therapy and pulmonary rehab. Have not smoked in over 35 years. Diagnosed with C O P D, Diabetes. Former Vietnam Veteran, and VA at a quandary right now. experiencing vertigo sometimes while lying down.
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Answered by Dr. Olsi Taka (44 minutes later)
Brief Answer:
Several possibilities.

Detailed Answer:
Hello,

There may be several causes of loss of consciousness. The most common groups are heart issues and seizures. Heart issues such as abnormal rhythm may lead to episodes of insufficient blood pumping and as a result insufficient blood supply to the brain. Other heart related issues potentially responsible would be valve conditions such as narrowing of the aortic valve. For that reason it would be suggested to have a Holter ECG (prolonged heart rhythm monitoring through a portable device) as well as an ultrasound as initial steps.

If heart issues are excluded seizures as I said would be another possibility. They may have different origins, stroke and trauma being the most common. For that purpose tests like EEG (registering brain electrical activity) as well as brain imaging preferably by MRI would be advised.

Some blood tests for anemia, glucose or electrolyte alterations are also routine in evaluation of loss of consciousness.

Regards,
Dr. Olsi Taka,
Neurologist


Above answer was peer-reviewed by : Dr. Chakravarthy Mazumdar
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Dr. Olsi Taka

Neurologist

Practicing since :2004

Answered : 3655 Questions

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What causes momentary loss of consciousness in a diabetic with COPD?

Brief Answer: Several possibilities. Detailed Answer: Hello, There may be several causes of loss of consciousness. The most common groups are heart issues and seizures. Heart issues such as abnormal rhythm may lead to episodes of insufficient blood pumping and as a result insufficient blood supply to the brain. Other heart related issues potentially responsible would be valve conditions such as narrowing of the aortic valve. For that reason it would be suggested to have a Holter ECG (prolonged heart rhythm monitoring through a portable device) as well as an ultrasound as initial steps. If heart issues are excluded seizures as I said would be another possibility. They may have different origins, stroke and trauma being the most common. For that purpose tests like EEG (registering brain electrical activity) as well as brain imaging preferably by MRI would be advised. Some blood tests for anemia, glucose or electrolyte alterations are also routine in evaluation of loss of consciousness. Regards, Dr. Olsi Taka, Neurologist