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What causes joints pain with welts and teeth problems?

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Posted on Fri, 3 Jul 2015
Question: My husband has had a lot test done and we can't seem to come to any conclusions. His white cell is elevated, he has joint pain with welts he has teeth problems over and over he has been tested for everything from lupis to tick bite we have a friend of his that has shared the same type of systems and had all the same tests, He just passed away from a bacterial blood disease and my husband is concerned because they spent a lot of time together he was told that the test that would have diagnosed the problem was not done because it is so rare so should my husband be concerned
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Answered by Dr. Bonnie Berger-Durnbaugh (25 minutes later)
Brief Answer:
Yes, I would have the test done.

Detailed Answer:
I am sorry your husband's problems have gone without a diagnosis (or diagnoses as there may be more than one underlying cause going on).

I would recommend getting the test done that would have diagnosed your husband's friend. I say this for a couple of reasons:

1. It will give you more peace of mind. Without it you may continue to worry that your husband has the same thing as his friend and will go the same way.

2. You don't have a diagnosis for your husband, even after various tests, so what do you have to lose by getting this one?

Sometimes people can have rheumatological problems that are not clearly diagnosed but the condition eventually resolves without ever finding the underlying cause. But that said, it is wise to keep looking. People with undiagnosed problems often go to a number of different doctors and sometimes one of them will find what is going on. For example I had a patient who had fevers and a variety of symptoms that no one could figure out with standard rheumatology work ups and common infections work ups. I sent her to our university hospital's infectious disease specialist for "fevers of unknown origins" and while she didn't have an infectious disease, it was found that she had "anticardiolipin antibodies" - something no one else checked for as it isn't a common antibody for Lupus or Vasculitis. I am writing this story because I would encourage your husband to try immunologically trained doctors from different areas who may run tests for more exotic things - infectious disease doctors, university/research based allergists, etc. (in addition to rheumatologists). Perhaps you have already tried all 3 areas but if not, it's something to consider.

I think it is less likely that your husband picked up the cause of his disorder from his friend, but is it possible that they both were exposed to something at the same time?



Above answer was peer-reviewed by : Dr. Chakravarthy Mazumdar
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Follow up: Dr. Bonnie Berger-Durnbaugh (44 minutes later)
Thank you I will get the test done and follow up I think seeing a immunological dr is also a good idea by the way I just found out he had Bacteremia
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Answered by Dr. Bonnie Berger-Durnbaugh (2 hours later)
Brief Answer:
Do you know what the bacteria was that caused the bacteremia?

Detailed Answer:
Bacteremia is a general term for when some bacteria get into the blood. It can be very mild and transient (and self limiting) or can turn into a severe infection and sepsis (a potentially fatal situation when the body releases chemicals to try to attack the infection). Certain bacteria are more dangerous if in the blood, such as strep.

Bacteremia is treated with antibiotics.

It is diagnosed with a CBC (complete blood count) and blood cultures. The blood cultures are to find and identify the bacteria. However, sometimes blood cultures do not always find the bacteria in a particular blood sample if there aren't many bacteria present. But it is worth a try.

If you live near a major university hospital, consider having a consult with an immunology and infectious disease specialist.

I hope this information helps and that your husband's health is fully restored.
Above answer was peer-reviewed by : Dr. Chakravarthy Mazumdar
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Answered by
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Dr. Bonnie Berger-Durnbaugh

General & Family Physician

Practicing since :1991

Answered : 3138 Questions

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What causes joints pain with welts and teeth problems?

Brief Answer: Yes, I would have the test done. Detailed Answer: I am sorry your husband's problems have gone without a diagnosis (or diagnoses as there may be more than one underlying cause going on). I would recommend getting the test done that would have diagnosed your husband's friend. I say this for a couple of reasons: 1. It will give you more peace of mind. Without it you may continue to worry that your husband has the same thing as his friend and will go the same way. 2. You don't have a diagnosis for your husband, even after various tests, so what do you have to lose by getting this one? Sometimes people can have rheumatological problems that are not clearly diagnosed but the condition eventually resolves without ever finding the underlying cause. But that said, it is wise to keep looking. People with undiagnosed problems often go to a number of different doctors and sometimes one of them will find what is going on. For example I had a patient who had fevers and a variety of symptoms that no one could figure out with standard rheumatology work ups and common infections work ups. I sent her to our university hospital's infectious disease specialist for "fevers of unknown origins" and while she didn't have an infectious disease, it was found that she had "anticardiolipin antibodies" - something no one else checked for as it isn't a common antibody for Lupus or Vasculitis. I am writing this story because I would encourage your husband to try immunologically trained doctors from different areas who may run tests for more exotic things - infectious disease doctors, university/research based allergists, etc. (in addition to rheumatologists). Perhaps you have already tried all 3 areas but if not, it's something to consider. I think it is less likely that your husband picked up the cause of his disorder from his friend, but is it possible that they both were exposed to something at the same time?