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What causes elevated heart rate while doing daily activities?

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Posted on Wed, 18 May 2016
Question: Good afternoon. My name is XXXX I am 27 years old. I have a history of asthma since I was 8 month old, for the past years it has been under control until a few month ago that I had a mild episode. An echo cardiogram done a few month ago also showed small traces of Mitral and Tricuspid regurgitation. I have had no symptoms associated with that, but I started noticing something that led me to formulate this query. While testing, seating my heart rate is about 85 bpm, but when I stand up and go about normal activities such as moving around, walking, cooking I noticed my heart rate can be 117 and after a few minutes goes down to 106-103. Is this a motive for me to worry, or is this associated with my small traces of Mitral-Tricuspid regurgitation?
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Answered by Dr. Meriton Siqeca (1 hour later)
Brief Answer:
Nothing to worry about - normal heart rate respone

Detailed Answer:
Greetings and welcome to HCM, XXXXX. Thank you for your question. I understand your concern.

Well, first of all, I would like to inform you that trivial mitral and tricuspid regurgitation may be found in normal individuals, from time to time. You are young, a 27-year old person, and such findings have no clinical significance whatsoever.

As about the heart rate: heart rate normally is 60-100 beats per minute. This applies to resting states, and it is considered normal. Plus-minus beats per minute, out from these ranges, are also considered normal. When our organism is put under a certain stress, such as physical activity, psychological stress, anxiety/panic, caffeine-containing beverages, heart rate tends to be increased, and this is a physiological phenomenon which indicates that the heart is engaged in completing the peripheral tissues and organs with blood (oxygen and nutrient) supply. As the matter of fact, the figures you provided are totally acceptable, as in moderate-high stress situations the heart rate can go up to 193 beats per minute in your case (the formula being: 220 - age). Therefore, my opinion is that there is nothing to worry about and that there is no clinical or any kind of relation between the echo cardiogram findings and your heart rate.

I hope you find my answer helpful. I am happy to help, should you have follow-up questions.

Best regards,
Dr. Meriton
Above answer was peer-reviewed by : Dr. Naveen Kumar
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Answered by
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Dr. Meriton Siqeca

Cardiologist

Practicing since :2009

Answered : 773 Questions

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What causes elevated heart rate while doing daily activities?

Brief Answer: Nothing to worry about - normal heart rate respone Detailed Answer: Greetings and welcome to HCM, XXXXX. Thank you for your question. I understand your concern. Well, first of all, I would like to inform you that trivial mitral and tricuspid regurgitation may be found in normal individuals, from time to time. You are young, a 27-year old person, and such findings have no clinical significance whatsoever. As about the heart rate: heart rate normally is 60-100 beats per minute. This applies to resting states, and it is considered normal. Plus-minus beats per minute, out from these ranges, are also considered normal. When our organism is put under a certain stress, such as physical activity, psychological stress, anxiety/panic, caffeine-containing beverages, heart rate tends to be increased, and this is a physiological phenomenon which indicates that the heart is engaged in completing the peripheral tissues and organs with blood (oxygen and nutrient) supply. As the matter of fact, the figures you provided are totally acceptable, as in moderate-high stress situations the heart rate can go up to 193 beats per minute in your case (the formula being: 220 - age). Therefore, my opinion is that there is nothing to worry about and that there is no clinical or any kind of relation between the echo cardiogram findings and your heart rate. I hope you find my answer helpful. I am happy to help, should you have follow-up questions. Best regards, Dr. Meriton