question-icon

What Causes Dizziness, Fatigue And Blurred Vision?

default
Posted on Wed, 19 Oct 2016
Question: Hi there -- I'm not sure what I have, but I definitely have something. I'm a 5'8, 41 year old XXXXXXX XXXXXXX male. I weigh 186 pounds. For the last 6 months I have been getting dizzy, I'm extremely fatigued, I have blurred vision and I have tingling in my left foot. The symptoms would point to diabetes, but I have done a Glucose, Serum test in May of 2015 and May of 2016 and the results are in the standard range both times. (Most recently 89 md/dl.) I have high cholesterol: Total 245: 316 Triglycerides, 33 HDL, 63 VLDL and 149 LDL. Could this all be related to my high cholesterol? I'm not currently taking medicine. My doctor says I'm fine, but I'm clearly not. (My blood pressure is 124/76.) Please help!
doctor
Answered by Dr. Shehzad Topiwala (23 minutes later)
Brief Answer:
Tests

Detailed Answer:
Sorry to learn about your bothersome symptoms.

The cholesterol readings that you have cannot explain your symptoms.

Other reasons need to be explored such as thyroid problems.
When I see someone like you in my practice, I typically order the following blood tests in addition to a detailed physical examination:

CBC (Complete Blood Count, also known as Hemogram; includes Hemoglobin, WBC and Platelet counts)
Electrolytes (Sodium and Potassium in particular)
HbA1c (Glycosylated Hemoglobin = your last 3 months' glucose average). Also known by other names such as GlycoHemoglobin or Glycated Hemoglobin or A1c
Liver function tests (SGOT , SGPT, Albumin, Bilirubin, Alkaline Phosphatase)
Kidney function tests (BUN, Creatinine)
TSH (checks your thyroid)

25 hydroxy Vitamin D levels (ideal range 40 to 60 ng/ml = 100 to 150 nmol/liter)

None of these tests require any fasting and can be done at any time of the day Correct diagnosis and treatment requires the opportunity to examine the patient so you must see an endocrinologist in-person.
Above answer was peer-reviewed by : Dr. Chakravarthy Mazumdar
doctor
default
Follow up: Dr. Shehzad Topiwala (33 minutes later)
I do have the results of many of these tests:

WBC: 4.4X10E3/UL
Hemoglobin: 13.5 g/dl
Platelets: 179x10E3/ul
BUN: 10 mg/dl
Creatinine: 1.06mg/dl
TSH: 1.970
SGOT: 25 IU/L
SGPT: 27 IU/L
Bilirubin: .3 md/dl
Alkaline Phosphatase, S; 78 IU/L
Albumin, Serum : 4.6 g/dl
Sodium Serum: 141 mmol/L
Potassium, Serum: 4.2 mmol/L

Do any of these results narrow down what you're thinking? This is all very scary for me.

doctor
Answered by Dr. Shehzad Topiwala (33 minutes later)
Brief Answer:
Follow up

Detailed Answer:
I see.

You will need a detailed physical examination to arrive at the diagnosis
Above answer was peer-reviewed by : Dr. Chakravarthy Mazumdar
doctor
Answered by
Dr.
Dr. Shehzad Topiwala

Endocrinologist

Practicing since :2001

Answered : 1663 Questions

premium_optimized

The User accepted the expert's answer

Share on

Get personalised answers from verified doctor in minutes across 80+ specialties

152 Doctors Online

By proceeding, I accept the Terms and Conditions

HCM Blog Instant Access to Doctors
HCM Blog Questions Answered
HCM Blog Satisfaction
What Causes Dizziness, Fatigue And Blurred Vision?

Brief Answer: Tests Detailed Answer: Sorry to learn about your bothersome symptoms. The cholesterol readings that you have cannot explain your symptoms. Other reasons need to be explored such as thyroid problems. When I see someone like you in my practice, I typically order the following blood tests in addition to a detailed physical examination: CBC (Complete Blood Count, also known as Hemogram; includes Hemoglobin, WBC and Platelet counts) Electrolytes (Sodium and Potassium in particular) HbA1c (Glycosylated Hemoglobin = your last 3 months' glucose average). Also known by other names such as GlycoHemoglobin or Glycated Hemoglobin or A1c Liver function tests (SGOT , SGPT, Albumin, Bilirubin, Alkaline Phosphatase) Kidney function tests (BUN, Creatinine) TSH (checks your thyroid) 25 hydroxy Vitamin D levels (ideal range 40 to 60 ng/ml = 100 to 150 nmol/liter) None of these tests require any fasting and can be done at any time of the day Correct diagnosis and treatment requires the opportunity to examine the patient so you must see an endocrinologist in-person.