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What causes chest pain radiating to left arm and sweating?

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Psychiatrist
Practicing since : 2000
Answered : 2475 Questions
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Can all my daily severe symptoms including severe central chest pain that radiates to my left arm back of my shoulder and up into my neck and jaw, the profuse sweating, the palpatations and the breathlessness be from anxiety even when I'm not having a panic attack? I am constantly thinking about my heart and having a heart attack 24/7 I'm that scared
I spend all day everyday I'm agony with chest/pain/left arm pain and jaw pain it is so severe

Can anxiety create these intense exact cardiac symptoms? Can it mimic a heart attack exactly like a real one?

I feel so unwell I haven't slept for four months this is how long it's been going on for I have no energy I'm depressed and spend my days on the internet trying to find out if I'm having a heart attack

I have had a ct scan of my heart and an echocardiogram both came back normal

Would the ct scan of my heart rule out everything? Including small arteries? I know it came back saying everything was normal but I don't know what was normal like valves and arteries plus my mothers sister had every test done and told she had anxiety and to stop wasting people's time and she died of a 95% blockage in her arteries three weeks later

I constantly feel like this and I'm so exhausted and I feel genuinely unwell which frightens me more I'm convinced it's my heart I get dizzy and light headed easily too

I had elevated troponin once it was 44 the dr said it's not high enough for heart attack that should be in the thousands or millions but it was still elevated then six hours later went down to normal under ten and the troponin tests I've had done since then are all under

I was in a packed out cinema and in full blown anxiety attack when I felt the pain shot from my chest down my arm like a lightning bolt then I got the 44 reading, so I'm curious to know if anyone knows if panic attacks and anxiety can elevate troponin levels only for them to return to normal once panic seizes
My own dr said it's not possible to have elevated troponin without heart damage and he can't understand why it went back to normal so fast
Have I had a heart attack without getting treatment ?

I sweat that much I have to carry a towel with me and I'm not obese I'm 5ft2. 10 and a half stone and was a smoker for 10 years I quit three months ago I'm also known to have a resting pulse rate of 115

I just need to know if I'm in danger of a heart attack
Posted Mon, 11 Aug 2014 in Hypertension and Heart Disease
 
 
Answered by Dr. Ashok Kumar 58 minutes later
Brief Answer:
Troponin do not rise in panic attack

Detailed Answer:
Hi,
Thanks for using Healthcaremagiccom.

The panic attacks and heart attacks are quite similar in nature and at times very difficult to differentiate among two conditions.
Having said this troponin do not rise in panic attack and the reading of 44 in your case was laboratory error. It is not possible to normalize for the troponin within 6 hours. So I can say at least one of the your report was result of laboratory error.

CT can not rule out everything but in expert hands it is very good investigation. The better test in acute condition is ECG to rule out or confirm acute heart attack. I hope your doctor done one when you presented for ER department and found nothing abnormal.


As you have family history of heart attack and personal history of smoking which is a risk factor for cardiovascular diseases including heart attack. If your doctor is convinced with angiography, than it is better to go for one as it will give definite picture of blockage in your coronary arteries if anything is there.

'Hope I have answered your query. If you have any further questions I will be happy to help".
Thanks

Above answer was peer-reviewed by
 
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