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What causes chest congestion, persistent cough and difficulty in breathing with asthma?

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Posted on Fri, 20 May 2016
Question: I have had chest congestion, cough for month and a half. I have been on 3 rounds of steroids and antibiotics and still cant cough up phlegm. It also is making it difficult to breath. Xray didn't reveal pneumonia. I feel something is seriously wrong because steroids and antibiotics have always helped me. I also have asthma.
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Answered by Dr. Shafi Ullah Khan (1 hour later)
Brief Answer:
Asthma exacerbations.

Detailed Answer:
Thank you for asking

I read your question and i understand your concern. Severe chest congestion, cough, inability to expectorate phlegm out, no pneumonia on x ray , makes it an acute exacerbation of asthma, Treatment for asthma needs to be increased. Adding long acting bronchodilators and corticosteroids to asthma medications, along with theophylline and leukotriene antagonists. Frequent nebulization at least 4 times a day and a visit to a pulmonologist to have pulmonary functions tests before and after bronchodilation to see the extent of reversibility.

Nutshell, its an acute exacerbation of asthma and needs immediate care with step up therapies for asthma. Talk to your doctor and let them decide what is best for you.

I hope it helps. Take good care of yourself and dont forget to close the discussion please.

Regards
Khan
Above answer was peer-reviewed by : Dr. Chakravarthy Mazumdar
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Answered by
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Dr. Shafi Ullah Khan

General & Family Physician

Practicing since :2012

Answered : 3613 Questions

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What causes chest congestion, persistent cough and difficulty in breathing with asthma?

Brief Answer: Asthma exacerbations. Detailed Answer: Thank you for asking I read your question and i understand your concern. Severe chest congestion, cough, inability to expectorate phlegm out, no pneumonia on x ray , makes it an acute exacerbation of asthma, Treatment for asthma needs to be increased. Adding long acting bronchodilators and corticosteroids to asthma medications, along with theophylline and leukotriene antagonists. Frequent nebulization at least 4 times a day and a visit to a pulmonologist to have pulmonary functions tests before and after bronchodilation to see the extent of reversibility. Nutshell, its an acute exacerbation of asthma and needs immediate care with step up therapies for asthma. Talk to your doctor and let them decide what is best for you. I hope it helps. Take good care of yourself and dont forget to close the discussion please. Regards Khan