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What causes burning feeling in underarm with painful tiny bumps?

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Posted on Wed, 24 Jun 2015
Question: 22 year old daughter is complaining of burning under her arms with painful small little tiny bumps she is married with a 13 month old daughter that has a yeast diaper rash
she has changed deodorant, not shaved under her arms, what advice?
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Answered by Dr. Saddiq Ulabidin (57 minutes later)
Brief Answer:
Case of Intertrigo or Folliclutis probabaly, but needs dermatologist review

Detailed Answer:
Hello,

Welcome to Health Care Magic.

Thanks for writing.

I am Dr. Saddiq ul Abidin. I have read your question completely, I understand your concern and will try to help you in best way possible.

The description you have provided can be caused by multiple factors, however for appropriate diagnosis in skin lesions, examination of the rash or blisters is pivotal and can be conclusive at many occasions.

Along with the presence of painful blisters or bumps, it would have been more appreciable if we had known whether it has any discharge or pus from it? What kind of bumps are these? Pinkish scaly or darkish crusty? Also that whether the rash has a clear demarcation from the surrounding skin or not?

WBC counts at time may be suggestive whether infection is likely to allergic, viral or bacterial but in early infections it can come normal.

For appropriate diagnosis, it would be better to visit a dermatologist or try uploading the pictures of the lesion if possible.

If it is not scaly, raised and itchy, or blackish clearly demarcated, it cant be Psoriasis, Dermatitis or Erythrasma respectively. Presence of Early Shingles can't be excluded but it normally precedes with fever or flu like symptoms along with painful individual tiny bumps before onset of rash. Also that in shingles the bumps are vesicular, that is, containing clear fluid which becomes crusty or drying up.

The likelihood however, of Folliculitis (Hair follicles infection) or Itertrigo (Yeast infection in body folds) is quite high, but nothing can be said with surety, without examining the lesion. Also to look and examine for any associated lymph nodes enlargement and in certain cases the biopsy of lesion or lymph node is needed in long standing cases.

Treatment should be based specifically on the diagnosis, as in folliculitis, local or systemic (oral) antibiotics for gram positive bacteria mostly, along with topical emollients is suggested, but for Intertrigo use of topical steroids or occasional addition of antifungal like cotrimaxozole is often recommended.

The supportive management would normally include gentle cleansing with cottons swabs, increasing local hygiene, use of adsorbent or barrier creams like zinc oxide pastes or exposure to air and light for some time is often helpful. You can discuss these options in detail with your dermatologist once you get a thorough check up getting done.

I hope this answered your question.If you have more queries I am happy to answer. Otherwise rate before closing the discussion

Regrads.

Dr.Saddiq ul Abidin
M.B.B.S(Licensed Family Physician)
Resident Medicine.
Above answer was peer-reviewed by : Dr. Neel Kudchadkar
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Dr. Saddiq Ulabidin

General & Family Physician

Practicing since :2011

Answered : 3717 Questions

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What causes burning feeling in underarm with painful tiny bumps?

Brief Answer: Case of Intertrigo or Folliclutis probabaly, but needs dermatologist review Detailed Answer: Hello, Welcome to Health Care Magic. Thanks for writing. I am Dr. Saddiq ul Abidin. I have read your question completely, I understand your concern and will try to help you in best way possible. The description you have provided can be caused by multiple factors, however for appropriate diagnosis in skin lesions, examination of the rash or blisters is pivotal and can be conclusive at many occasions. Along with the presence of painful blisters or bumps, it would have been more appreciable if we had known whether it has any discharge or pus from it? What kind of bumps are these? Pinkish scaly or darkish crusty? Also that whether the rash has a clear demarcation from the surrounding skin or not? WBC counts at time may be suggestive whether infection is likely to allergic, viral or bacterial but in early infections it can come normal. For appropriate diagnosis, it would be better to visit a dermatologist or try uploading the pictures of the lesion if possible. If it is not scaly, raised and itchy, or blackish clearly demarcated, it cant be Psoriasis, Dermatitis or Erythrasma respectively. Presence of Early Shingles can't be excluded but it normally precedes with fever or flu like symptoms along with painful individual tiny bumps before onset of rash. Also that in shingles the bumps are vesicular, that is, containing clear fluid which becomes crusty or drying up. The likelihood however, of Folliculitis (Hair follicles infection) or Itertrigo (Yeast infection in body folds) is quite high, but nothing can be said with surety, without examining the lesion. Also to look and examine for any associated lymph nodes enlargement and in certain cases the biopsy of lesion or lymph node is needed in long standing cases. Treatment should be based specifically on the diagnosis, as in folliculitis, local or systemic (oral) antibiotics for gram positive bacteria mostly, along with topical emollients is suggested, but for Intertrigo use of topical steroids or occasional addition of antifungal like cotrimaxozole is often recommended. The supportive management would normally include gentle cleansing with cottons swabs, increasing local hygiene, use of adsorbent or barrier creams like zinc oxide pastes or exposure to air and light for some time is often helpful. You can discuss these options in detail with your dermatologist once you get a thorough check up getting done. I hope this answered your question.If you have more queries I am happy to answer. Otherwise rate before closing the discussion Regrads. Dr.Saddiq ul Abidin M.B.B.S(Licensed Family Physician) Resident Medicine.