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What are the signs and symptoms of pheochromocytoma?

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Posted on Wed, 10 Feb 2016
Question: this is an inquiry continuation to the one i had recently with Dr. xxxxxxxxxxxxxx regarding suspected Pheochromocytoma. i have done 2 24 hour urine tests for Pheochromocytoma.i will not have full results until next week, i have had 3 adrenal spikes where my blood pressure has been 174 over 121 and in that region i was sent by ambulance to the emergency room by my GP and had a chest xray and ECG that also showed my heart both in good condition other than mild copd. the region i live in in the uk Portsmouth ambulance and emergency room is under great strain and in crisis as is our NHS i had to wait 10 hours to be seen by a Junior doctor, i was sent home and told to call 999 if it happens again it did last night and it took 40 min's for one volunteer to show up without equipment because luckily i was OK after an hour albeit feeling very unwell. i feel i am at risk i don't have any heart meds is there anything i can do for myself to avoid a stroke or heart attack until i have results my GP tells me she can only offer me heart meds when she has results either way next week, i am grateful for our NHS as i cannot afford private health care. thank you Susanne Healy
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Answered by Dr. Shehzad Topiwala (14 hours later)
Brief Answer:
Pheochromocytoma

Detailed Answer:
Sorry to learn about the situation. I follow what you are saying. When I encounter a patient in such circumstances I empirically start treatment with medication that I typically use for pheochromocytoma even while I'm waiting for results. The reason is as you surmised too that it can be life threatening. So I generally start either phenoxybenzamine or prazosin along with others as needed to control blood pressure. There are certain types of blood pressure and heart medications that MUST be avoided in the beginning. These are called BETA BLOCKERS. They are to be utilised only later once the previously mentioned meds have had their effect. You must stay well hydrated. If course , managing this is complex and requires the expertise of an endocrinologist who can examine and follow you closely
Above answer was peer-reviewed by : Dr. Chakravarthy Mazumdar
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Follow up: Dr. Shehzad Topiwala (8 hours later)
Thank you Dr Topiwala
I'm sorry i did not reply sooner for some reason your answers are not getting to me until the early hours of the morning, maybe the time difference in the United States. Can you tell me please if Diazipan can make this condition worse without taking phenoxybenzamine or prazosin, or in your opinion will they help at 2mg 3 times daily.
thank you very much for your time i am worried about taking any medications at present.
best wishes Susanne Healy
doctor
Answered by Dr. Shehzad Topiwala (1 hour later)
Brief Answer:
Follow up

Detailed Answer:
Diazepam wont affect the underlying condition either way, provided you truly turn out to have Pheochromocytoma and regardless of whether and which medication you take for it

Above answer was peer-reviewed by : Dr. Chakravarthy Mazumdar
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Answered by
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Dr. Shehzad Topiwala

Endocrinologist

Practicing since :2001

Answered : 1663 Questions

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What are the signs and symptoms of pheochromocytoma?

Brief Answer: Pheochromocytoma Detailed Answer: Sorry to learn about the situation. I follow what you are saying. When I encounter a patient in such circumstances I empirically start treatment with medication that I typically use for pheochromocytoma even while I'm waiting for results. The reason is as you surmised too that it can be life threatening. So I generally start either phenoxybenzamine or prazosin along with others as needed to control blood pressure. There are certain types of blood pressure and heart medications that MUST be avoided in the beginning. These are called BETA BLOCKERS. They are to be utilised only later once the previously mentioned meds have had their effect. You must stay well hydrated. If course , managing this is complex and requires the expertise of an endocrinologist who can examine and follow you closely