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What are the chances of HIV transmission from HIV infected female to male?

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Posted on Mon, 10 Nov 2014
Question: Greetings!

I am totally confused about HIV testing & window period? Below is the brief history of the tests conducted by me after the ONE AND ONLY un-protected contact I had with a female sex worker. It was not a complete intercourse but just insertion and withdrawal after 30 - 40 seconds (due to fear of STD).

1. P 24 done on self 3 days after contact
2. HIV Antibody test done on that female 5 days after the contact
3. P 24 done on self 21 days after contact
4. VDRL and HIV antibody and P24 (using CMAI method) done on self 102 days after contact
5. VDRL and HIV antibody and P 24 (using CMAI method) done one self 152 days after contact

Results for all the above were negative but fear and anxiety is killing me. There is so much of difference in opinion pertaining to window period. What time duration can be treated as window period in above case? Do I need to get any further test done? How can I conclude that I donot carry HIV? Kindly help me out and oblige.
doctor
Answered by Dr. Bharatesh Devendra Basti (13 minutes later)
Brief Answer:
3-6 months window period.

Detailed Answer:
Hi
Thank you for query.
The chances of HIV infection transmission from HIV infected female to male is 1/1000 to 1/2000. If uninfected female no chance.
It is More likely she will be negative.you need not worry at all.
Moreover all your tests for both antigen and antibodies are repeatedly negative so you can allay fears totally of HIV.
Window period is usually 3 months maximum 6 month. Very rarest is up to 9 -12 month.
So you can allay fears as least risk exposure and repeated tests negative.
I do not see need for any further test. These tests are conclusive.
You can get back for any clarification
Thank you
Dr Bharatesh
Dermatologist and venereologist
Above answer was peer-reviewed by : Dr. Bhagyalaxmi Nalaparaju
doctor
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Follow up: Dr. Bharatesh Devendra Basti (22 minutes later)
Thanks doctor. I am sorry in the very beginning if I am being repetitive or frustrating you with baseless queries.

I agree that female tested negative - but what if she was in window period?

Secondly, how effective is P 24 test - it is said that this test will capture all kind of infections during window period (even before development of antibodies). Are there any chances that P24 turns to be "false negative"? After how much time of exposure does P24 start picking up the antigen ?

Some people trust P24 more than they trust antibody test? Is this understanding correct?
doctor
Answered by Dr. Bharatesh Devendra Basti (8 minutes later)
Brief Answer:
p24 antigen tests good in early stage

Detailed Answer:
Hi
Thank you for follow up query.
P24 ag can be detected as early as 3 weeks post exposure. So they are more reliable in earlier stages. these are detected even during window period . p24 antigen false negative are common in later stage of disease after 6 months.
Window period is for antibodies to appear not for antigen.
antibodies test are good in later stages by 3 months. You have both negative repeatedly so you can allay fears.
You can get back for any clarification else close the discussion and rate.
Thank you
Dr Bharatesh
Above answer was peer-reviewed by : Dr. Bhagyalaxmi Nalaparaju
doctor
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Follow up: Dr. Bharatesh Devendra Basti (13 minutes later)
Thanks doctor one last follow up question :

If P 24 can detect antigen early, and I tested P 24 negative on day 3,21,102 and 152 - does that mean I can conclude my case "IRRESPECTIVE of window period" etc

Also, if P24 comes false negative at later stages, by such time antibody test should turn out to be positive - Correct?

Many thanks for your prompt feedback and Kind Regards!
doctor
Answered by Dr. Bharatesh Devendra Basti (7 minutes later)
Brief Answer:
yes correct

Detailed Answer:
Hi
Thank you for follow up query.
As antigen tests are negative in earlier stages and antibodies are negative later stages and both negative repeatedly you can take it as conclusive that you are negative for HIV.
Antibody will cum positive in later stages if ag negative.
You are right
You can get back for any clarification
Thank you
Dr Bharatesh
Above answer was peer-reviewed by : Dr. Bhagyalaxmi Nalaparaju
doctor
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Follow up: Dr. Bharatesh Devendra Basti (11 minutes later)
Sir, that means if a person is P24 negative in early stages - he need not do any antibody test in later stages, because if he had infection P24 would capture it?
doctor
Answered by Dr. Bharatesh Devendra Basti (8 minutes later)
Brief Answer:
rarely false negative possible.

Detailed Answer:
Hi
Thank you for query.
There are chances of false negative p24 ag even in early stages which usually Is rare you need not worry.P24 ag will be captured if infected with HIV.
As no test will be 100% accurate.
Antibodies are formed if the person is exposed to HIV virus .so it is done later and as confirmation also to relieve the anxiety.
You forget about episode and relax and allay fears of HIV.
You can get back for any clarification
Thank you
Dr Bharatesh
Above answer was peer-reviewed by : Dr. Bhagyalaxmi Nalaparaju
doctor
Answered by
Dr.
Dr. Bharatesh Devendra Basti

Dermatologist

Practicing since :1998

Answered : 1764 Questions

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What are the chances of HIV transmission from HIV infected female to male?

Brief Answer: 3-6 months window period. Detailed Answer: Hi Thank you for query. The chances of HIV infection transmission from HIV infected female to male is 1/1000 to 1/2000. If uninfected female no chance. It is More likely she will be negative.you need not worry at all. Moreover all your tests for both antigen and antibodies are repeatedly negative so you can allay fears totally of HIV. Window period is usually 3 months maximum 6 month. Very rarest is up to 9 -12 month. So you can allay fears as least risk exposure and repeated tests negative. I do not see need for any further test. These tests are conclusive. You can get back for any clarification Thank you Dr Bharatesh Dermatologist and venereologist