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What are the adverse effects of Ibuprofen?

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Posted on Wed, 12 Oct 2016
Question: I am reading the 3 page article about the hazards of using ibuprofin, even on short term basis, due to it's supposed dangers of increasing the probability of suffering a stroke. Near the bottom of the first page of the article, the word "enzyme" is used twice, but THE NAME OF "THAT ENZYME" has not yet been given. Yes, true, I am not doing high-level research about enzymes; and it may be that the name of the enzyme (or enzymes) is mentioned further on. To me this looks as if the writer's original material was not carefully and correctly transferred to typed matter on the internet. In addition, I would like to examine summarized data on controlled studies of how the incidence of deaths develope, as compared to both the frequency of use of ibuprofen, the time duration of use of ibuprofen, and the age of the decedents. ... I am not a medical professional, despite how my email address reads. "XXXX doctor" is an appellation which I acquired from friends who are familiar with my character. The plural use of the word "friends" should be correct: more than one person "invented" the XXXXXX doctor name -- there's a consensus on this minor point... I am also a very recent laminectomy patient who has suffered from herniated nucleus pulposus with excruicating pain in my legs and at the L4-L5 region; and temporary corporal disability, since the early 1970s; and whose current orthopedic surgeon, who is highly regarded by other orthos in this region, the operating doctor on my recent spinal treatment, a few years back accomplished what I might call a miraculous cure with this ghastly horrible and now intensely disdained store-shelf remedy. When I was suffering with excruiciating back spasms which made any movement from my bed-and-moist-heat pallet, my Doctor T______ prescribed for me the use of five standard ibupofen doses each 6 hours. Imagine how my amazement, and therefore high admiration, resulted, when my spinal stenosis pain attacks SUDDENLY CEASED TO OCCUR for over 10 years! I've had a recent echocardiogram done, and my ecent EKG shows an irregularity which still did not prevent me from undergoing the laminectomy L4-L5 procedure. [__v__V__v______v__V__v______v__V__v______, etc). I am 78 years old, tend to high blood sugar level, but low to moderate blood pressure, statin-medicated previously high cholesterol being maitained now at much lower levels, short bouts of medicated depressive mood swings, and, apparently, sleep apnea; all of those are being regularly monitored, thanks to my entitlement to Medicare and Tricare For Life health coverage, as a result of my 20 active duty years in the U.S. Navy. Thank you, and God bless you for having read all of this. I hope I haven't run over any web site character limit.
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Answered by Dr. Aashish Raghu (1 hour later)
Brief Answer:
Ibuprofen could be harmful in the long run. There are safer alternatives

Detailed Answer:
Hi there.

Thank you for explaining your health problem.

If you don't mind, could you please answer a few questions for me to compete the picture.

Has your Doctor educated you about Failed back syndrome?

Do you have radiating pain over the back of the legs?

Has an MRI scan been taken after the surgery?

Ibuprofen is known to inhibit COX1 and COX2 enzymes. Usually inhibition of COX2 enzyme can be dangerous for the heart and cause heart disease but inhibition of COX1 can cause gastric ulcers and kidney disease.

It is advisable to take safer medicines like Tablet Acetaminophen with Tramadol combination or Buprenorphine skin patch such can do the job well and avoid such side effects.

Even physiotherapy in the form of Short wave diathermy (SWD) or Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation (TENS) will do great benefit in remitting the muscle spasms.
Above answer was peer-reviewed by : Dr. Prasad
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Follow up: Dr. Aashish Raghu (1 hour later)
Answering your questions to me: 1. I have received no education about "Failed Back syndrome." Typically here physicians are so overloaded with continuous patient load that examinations are brief, judgements quick, and I must go see his office assistant for appointments to other doctors, for data which my first doctor needs; and he disappears from my site, as politely as he can. I know about failure; this is my first time hearing the term "failed back syndrome. 2. I DO NOT HAVE radiating pains over the backs of my legs. I'm expiriencing considerable relief from the pains my legs had before my laminotomy, which was done two days ago. 3. MRI was taken BEFORE the surgery. It is still Sunday here, a general holiday from weekly professional duties. In 24 hours from now, I can start going back to all the doctors involved in my laminotomy, and get a lot of answers and follow-up appointment dates I should have gotten before I was released from the hospital. The US work week in offices is usually monday until friday, & sometimes part of Saturday. Are you recommending that I MUST get a post surgery MRI?
COMMENTS
I must study up what roles COX1 and COX2 enzymes play in maintenance of my bodily health; I am still totally ignorant of them.
You proposing my use of tablet acetaminophen with Tramadol combination or Buprenorphine skin patch might be useful in my case, but most of my pain and movement limitation has been disposed of, and I am far, far more healthy and comfortable.
I am also sure that physiotherapy will be prescribed for me, as I have gone nearly two years long with far less body exercise that I should have done; but that was because of my load of pain and spinal damage.
Advise, please, if you can, what I should read, to study the statistics on deaths attributable to the inadvised use of ibuprophin, as mentioned in my first message. Simply talking about the risks involved in its use is, to my mind, totally insufficient information, if one does not cite specifics on the trends of numbers of deaths as a result of using ibuprophin inadvisably.
Thank you.
doctor
Answered by Dr. Aashish Raghu (24 hours later)
Brief Answer:
Answers

Detailed Answer:
Hi there.

Thanks for your reply to my questions. I appreciate the details you have provided.

Failed back syndrome usually encompasses possible complications of previous spine surgery on your present bearing.

Since you do not have radiating pain, there is less chance of any nerve root compression such may have resulted as a complication of Spine studysurgery as in your case Laminectomy.

Please perform physiotherapy and do try to stay fit as much as possible. MRI is not required at the moment.Acetaminophen and Tramadol tablet after consulting with your surgeon for your pain management. He will be able to provide better advice since he has been seeing you and conducting clinical examination upon you.

There are multiple studies on the safety profile of Ibuprofen and associated deaths on severe overdose. Kindly perform a search on the NCBI Pub MED website for the required information. I shall cite a single source for your reference.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC0000/




Above answer was peer-reviewed by : Dr. Prasad
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Dr. Aashish Raghu

Orthopaedic Surgeon

Practicing since :2011

Answered : 5363 Questions

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What are the adverse effects of Ibuprofen?

Brief Answer: Ibuprofen could be harmful in the long run. There are safer alternatives Detailed Answer: Hi there. Thank you for explaining your health problem. If you don't mind, could you please answer a few questions for me to compete the picture. Has your Doctor educated you about Failed back syndrome? Do you have radiating pain over the back of the legs? Has an MRI scan been taken after the surgery? Ibuprofen is known to inhibit COX1 and COX2 enzymes. Usually inhibition of COX2 enzyme can be dangerous for the heart and cause heart disease but inhibition of COX1 can cause gastric ulcers and kidney disease. It is advisable to take safer medicines like Tablet Acetaminophen with Tramadol combination or Buprenorphine skin patch such can do the job well and avoid such side effects. Even physiotherapy in the form of Short wave diathermy (SWD) or Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation (TENS) will do great benefit in remitting the muscle spasms.