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Suggest Treatment For Tendinitis, Cold Intolerance And Night Sweats

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Posted on Mon, 17 Oct 2016
Question: I'm having dysphasia muscle spasms and tendinitis cold intolerance but night sweats what could be the problem
doctor
Answered by Dr. Shehzad Topiwala (57 minutes later)
Brief Answer:
Tests

Detailed Answer:
Sorry to learn about your bothersome symptoms.

If your menstrual cycles are normal then this is unlikely to represent menopause related hot flashes.

Cold intolerance is one of the classic symptoms of an under-active thyroid condition called hypothyroidism.
When I see someone like you in my practice, I typically order the following blood tests in addition to a detailed physical examination:

CBC (Complete Blood Count, also known as Hemogram; includes Hemoglobin, WBC and Platelet counts)
Electrolytes (Sodium and Potassium in particular)
HbA1c (Glycosylated Hemoglobin = your last 3 months' glucose average). Also known by other names such as GlycoHemoglobin or Glycated Hemoglobin or A1c
Liver function tests (SGOT , SGPT, Albumin, Bilirubin, Alkaline Phosphatase)
Kidney function tests (BUN, Creatinine)
TSH (checks your thyroid)

25 hydroxy Vitamin D levels (ideal range 40 to 60 ng/ml = 100 to 150 nmol/liter)

None of these tests require any fasting and can be done at any time of the day Correct diagnosis and treatment requires the opportunity to examine the patient so you must see an endocrinologist in-person.
Above answer was peer-reviewed by : Dr. Chakravarthy Mazumdar
doctor
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Follow up: Dr. Shehzad Topiwala (24 hours later)
I have recently had all of those blood tests. The only ones that were out of range were AST elevated and low platelets these are due to my cirrhosis
I'm concerned my symptoms may be MS. I am having a barium swallow study done this week and had an MRI of my brain last week some impressions from the MRI were right posterolateral parietal lobe
encephalomalacia/gliosis
3. Slight interval worsening (since 1/24/2014) of multiple scattered punctate foci of FLAIR signal abnormality in the supratentorial white matter. This likely represents interval progression of mild chronic microvascular ischemia. Broad differential
diagnosis also includes sequela of previous trauma, migraine headache disorder, atypical infectious processes, demyelination, and vasculitis.
doctor
Answered by Dr. Shehzad Topiwala (20 hours later)
Brief Answer:
Follow up

Detailed Answer:
I see.

Well this MRI report and the symptoms you are experiencing require a thorough examination in-person by a Neurologist to make an accurate diagnosis
Above answer was peer-reviewed by : Dr. Chakravarthy Mazumdar
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Answered by
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Dr. Shehzad Topiwala

Endocrinologist

Practicing since :2001

Answered : 1663 Questions

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Suggest Treatment For Tendinitis, Cold Intolerance And Night Sweats

Brief Answer: Tests Detailed Answer: Sorry to learn about your bothersome symptoms. If your menstrual cycles are normal then this is unlikely to represent menopause related hot flashes. Cold intolerance is one of the classic symptoms of an under-active thyroid condition called hypothyroidism. When I see someone like you in my practice, I typically order the following blood tests in addition to a detailed physical examination: CBC (Complete Blood Count, also known as Hemogram; includes Hemoglobin, WBC and Platelet counts) Electrolytes (Sodium and Potassium in particular) HbA1c (Glycosylated Hemoglobin = your last 3 months' glucose average). Also known by other names such as GlycoHemoglobin or Glycated Hemoglobin or A1c Liver function tests (SGOT , SGPT, Albumin, Bilirubin, Alkaline Phosphatase) Kidney function tests (BUN, Creatinine) TSH (checks your thyroid) 25 hydroxy Vitamin D levels (ideal range 40 to 60 ng/ml = 100 to 150 nmol/liter) None of these tests require any fasting and can be done at any time of the day Correct diagnosis and treatment requires the opportunity to examine the patient so you must see an endocrinologist in-person.