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Suggest Treatment For Persistent Hypothyroidism

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Posted on Tue, 18 Oct 2016
Question: I am age 77&3/4. I have had copd for 10 years with oxygen @2.0 resting, 4.0active (shopping, walking out of home). I am also hypothyroid 16 years. I do not get headaches except from chocolate. I have blockage in both leg arteries since 1967....thrombosis, but not operated on. I am getting headaches for past 2 weeks, taking 1000mg every 12 hours. I take aspirin 81mg 1 every 5 days, because I bruise if too often. I go to drs. They don't listen. I think I might have low grade cerebral bleed.... what should i ask dr. when i go today? internal med/primary.
I sleep from 9 p.m. till 6.a.m., but nod off during the day, for brief times.
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Answered by Dr. Olsi Taka (57 minutes later)
Brief Answer:
Read below.

Detailed Answer:
I read your question carefully and I understand your concern.

It is unclear what have you been taking (you say 1000 mg every 12 hours, but have forgot to say the name of the drug).

Judging only from that info there is not any indication of a cerebral bleed. You do not mention any history of trauma and no other neurological symptoms apart from the headache, you do not say much about the characteristics of pain other (location, type etc). Headache is a very common symptoms which can be due to many causes, not necessarily a brain lesion. It may be due to blood pressure changes, copd, depression, anemia etc.

However I suppose you might have already heard those arguments before from your doctors, you are looking for indications of the contrary, of there being a brain lesion like a bleed. The only argument (but a strong one) is the fact that you have suffered no prior headaches and that a new headache persisting for several days in an elderly person requires further testing, possibly with brain imaging.
You should ask your doctor whether he finds any neurological deficits, whether he/she can provide an alternative explanation for the headache (high/low blood pressure, infection, anemia, low oxygen) from his tests. If he/she is unable to provide evidence about that then you could argue that considering your tendency to bleed this newly appearing headache requires imaging.

I remain at your disposal for further questions.
Above answer was peer-reviewed by : Dr. Chakravarthy Mazumdar
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Answered by
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Dr. Olsi Taka

Neurologist

Practicing since :2004

Answered : 3674 Questions

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Suggest Treatment For Persistent Hypothyroidism

Brief Answer: Read below. Detailed Answer: I read your question carefully and I understand your concern. It is unclear what have you been taking (you say 1000 mg every 12 hours, but have forgot to say the name of the drug). Judging only from that info there is not any indication of a cerebral bleed. You do not mention any history of trauma and no other neurological symptoms apart from the headache, you do not say much about the characteristics of pain other (location, type etc). Headache is a very common symptoms which can be due to many causes, not necessarily a brain lesion. It may be due to blood pressure changes, copd, depression, anemia etc. However I suppose you might have already heard those arguments before from your doctors, you are looking for indications of the contrary, of there being a brain lesion like a bleed. The only argument (but a strong one) is the fact that you have suffered no prior headaches and that a new headache persisting for several days in an elderly person requires further testing, possibly with brain imaging. You should ask your doctor whether he finds any neurological deficits, whether he/she can provide an alternative explanation for the headache (high/low blood pressure, infection, anemia, low oxygen) from his tests. If he/she is unable to provide evidence about that then you could argue that considering your tendency to bleed this newly appearing headache requires imaging. I remain at your disposal for further questions.