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Suggest Treatment For Lung Cancer

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Posted on Thu, 9 Nov 2017
Question: I have a question concerning cancer. When it comes to lung cancer and people who smoke, they always say that “you have X % of getting cancer,” even if you stopped smoking several years back and at a young age like me.


My question is about how cancer works basically. For example, let’s say I stopped smoking but no dna mutation was done to lungs. Am I still able to get lung cancer? Or what if my dna is mutated. Does that mean I automatically get lung cancer?


They talk about percentages but I don’t really know what that means. Does that mean that you’re not sure if I have mutated genes and just the chances of me getting cancer are based on that and then I develop it later on? Or that even if I don’t have mutated genes, I can still get them and get cancer?


I ask because people talk about risk and percentages but what if I stopped for X years but the mutation was already done??


People say my risk will go back to normal but what if I already mutated my genes? Then I guess it won't go back to normal right?
doctor
Answered by Dr. Dr. Esmeralda Sera (2 hours later)
Brief Answer:
Gene mutation

Detailed Answer:
Hello and thank you for asking

Mutations happen often, and the human body is normally able to correct most of them. Depending on where in the gene the change occurs, a mutation may be beneficial, harmful, or make no difference at all. So, one mutation alone is unlikely to lead to cancer. Usually, it takes multiple mutations over a lifetime to cause cancer. This is why cancer occurs more often in older people who have had more opportunities for mutations to build up.

There are a factor risck hou can helps this mutation,like smoking.Evean you have quite smoking ,that’s dose not mean that you don’t
have any risk developing cancer in your lifetime



Regards
Above answer was peer-reviewed by : Dr. Kampana
doctor
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Follow up: Dr. Dr. Esmeralda Sera (6 hours later)
well I smoked from 19-25 years of age and quit 3 years ago. I'm 29. I smoked half a pack a day. should I be worried
doctor
Answered by Dr. Dr. Esmeralda Sera (49 minutes later)
Brief Answer:
Gene mutation

Detailed Answer:
Hi again

No ,you should not be concerned. You are too young
Above answer was peer-reviewed by : Dr. Kampana
doctor
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Follow up: Dr. Dr. Esmeralda Sera (41 minutes later)
I am young but has the damage and mutation already been done from smoking? do I already have mutation and precancerous cells?
doctor
Answered by Dr. Dr. Esmeralda Sera (18 hours later)
Brief Answer:
MUTATIONS

Detailed Answer:
Hi As i say mutation happens often and it takes multiple mutation over lifetime to

develop cancer. I dont think that in your age you have mutation to cause cancer cause of smoking
Above answer was peer-reviewed by : Dr. Vaishalee Punj
doctor
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Follow up: Dr. Dr. Esmeralda Sera (11 hours later)
so I shouldn't get checked or an assement ?
doctor
Answered by Dr. Dr. Esmeralda Sera (12 minutes later)
Brief Answer:
Mutation

Detailed Answer:
No, you need not have any assessment for this

Regards


Above answer was peer-reviewed by : Dr. Arnab Banerjee
doctor
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Follow up: Dr. Dr. Esmeralda Sera (8 hours later)
well that's good to hear! so would you say with your expert opinion that I won't get it in the next 10 years if I don't pick up smoking again?
doctor
Answered by Dr. Dr. Esmeralda Sera (3 hours later)
Brief Answer:
Mutation

Detailed Answer:
Yes for sure you don't get it

Just quit smoking
Above answer was peer-reviewed by : Dr. Kampana
doctor
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Follow up: Dr. Dr. Esmeralda Sera (7 hours later)
would it matter if my great grandma died of lung cancer at 49? does that raise my risk?
doctor
Answered by Dr. Dr. Esmeralda Sera (2 hours later)
Brief Answer:
Mutation

Detailed Answer:
Hi again,

The genetic is a risk factor, but that doesn’t mean that you're at high-risk for this type of cancer though.

Hope this is clear now

Regards


Above answer was peer-reviewed by : Dr. Arnab Banerjee
doctor
Answered by
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Dr. Dr. Esmeralda Sera

Oncologist

Practicing since :1998

Answered : 1351 Questions

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Suggest Treatment For Lung Cancer

Brief Answer: Gene mutation Detailed Answer: Hello and thank you for asking Mutations happen often, and the human body is normally able to correct most of them. Depending on where in the gene the change occurs, a mutation may be beneficial, harmful, or make no difference at all. So, one mutation alone is unlikely to lead to cancer. Usually, it takes multiple mutations over a lifetime to cause cancer. This is why cancer occurs more often in older people who have had more opportunities for mutations to build up. There are a factor risck hou can helps this mutation,like smoking.Evean you have quite smoking ,that’s dose not mean that you don’t have any risk developing cancer in your lifetime Regards