question-icon

Suggest treatment for Rentinitis Pigmentosa

default
Posted on Fri, 6 May 2016
Question: My husband has rentinitis pigmentosa. I have heard there are new treatments that may help imporove his limited amount of vision. What can you tell me about this?
doctor
Answered by Dr. Diptanshu Das (5 hours later)
Brief Answer:
Treatment mentioned

Detailed Answer:
Thanks for asking on Health care magic.

Retinitis pigmentosa can be managed by:
* Very high daily doses of vitamin A palmitate (15,000 U/d) slow the progress of RP by about 2% per year.
* Nutritional intake of omega-3 fatty acids may reduce the rate of decline of visual acuity.
* Macular edema can reduce vision in the later stages of RP. Of the many therapies tried, oral acetazolamide has shown the most encouraging results with some improvement in visual function. Topical acetazolamide can be effective but has not been found to be as effective as oral therapy.
* Calcium channel blockers, such as diltiazem, can be effective. Studies ongoing.
* Lutein and zeaxanthin are macular pigments that the body cannot make but instead come from dietary sources. Lutein is thought to protect the macula from oxidative damage, and oral supplementation has been shown to increase the macular pigment. Doses from 6-20 mg per day have been recommended.
* Oral valproic acid has shown benefit in small clinical trials, and larger clinical trials are underway.
* Although doses of 1000 mg/d ascorbic acid have been recommended, no evidence exists that ascorbic acid is helpful.

Hope that helps.

Regards
Above answer was peer-reviewed by : Dr. Chakravarthy Mazumdar
doctor
Answered by
Dr.
Dr. Diptanshu Das

Pediatrician

Practicing since :2005

Answered : 3867 Questions

premium_optimized

The User accepted the expert's answer

Share on
Suggest treatment for Rentinitis Pigmentosa

Brief Answer: Treatment mentioned Detailed Answer: Thanks for asking on Health care magic. Retinitis pigmentosa can be managed by: * Very high daily doses of vitamin A palmitate (15,000 U/d) slow the progress of RP by about 2% per year. * Nutritional intake of omega-3 fatty acids may reduce the rate of decline of visual acuity. * Macular edema can reduce vision in the later stages of RP. Of the many therapies tried, oral acetazolamide has shown the most encouraging results with some improvement in visual function. Topical acetazolamide can be effective but has not been found to be as effective as oral therapy. * Calcium channel blockers, such as diltiazem, can be effective. Studies ongoing. * Lutein and zeaxanthin are macular pigments that the body cannot make but instead come from dietary sources. Lutein is thought to protect the macula from oxidative damage, and oral supplementation has been shown to increase the macular pigment. Doses from 6-20 mg per day have been recommended. * Oral valproic acid has shown benefit in small clinical trials, and larger clinical trials are underway. * Although doses of 1000 mg/d ascorbic acid have been recommended, no evidence exists that ascorbic acid is helpful. Hope that helps. Regards