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Suggest a diet plan for a person undergoing chemotherapy

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Posted on Fri, 24 Aug 2018
Question: I asked what foods & liquids I should be eating "hygienic" is not an answer. Please give me a list of the foods & a list & amount of liquids that can help my bladder not inflame it
doctor
Answered by Kathy Shattler (2 hours later)
Detailed Answer:
Hello,

If you are on chemotherapy, then you are immunocompromised and care should be taken that you do not get food poisoning, thus the recommendation for the "hygienic diet."

This nutrition therapy addresses the food safety concerns of individuals whose immunity is suppressed and who are at high risk for foodborne illness. This handout offers guidelines for which foods to eat and which foods to avoid to lower your risk of foodborne illness, tips for how to handle fresh fruits and vegetables, and proper cooking temperatures to keep your food safe to eat. Variations among institutions and physicians may occur, as well as updates with new food safety information.
Cooking Foods to Proper Temperatures
Proper cooking temperatures kill harmful bacteria present in food. Use a meat thermometer to check when meat, poultry, seafood, and dishes containing eggs are done cooking. The USDAFDA recommends safe minimum internal temperatures for numerous foods, which are listed below.  Beef, veal, pork, lamb: 145°F (allow to rest 3 minutes before carving or eating)  Poultry: 165°F  Ground beef, veal, pork, lamb: 160°F
 Ground poultry: 165°F
 Casseroles, egg dishes: 160°F 
Fin fish: 145°F or until opaque flesh flakes with a fork 
Scallops: cook until flesh is milky white or opaque and firm
 Shrimp, lobster, and crab: cook until they turn red and the flesh is pearly and opaque  Clams, oysters, and mussels: cook until shells open during cooking  Leftovers: reheat to at least 165°F  Deli-style meats and hot dogs: reheat until steaming hot or 165°F  Soups, gravies, and sauces: bring to a boil  Meat marinade: discard marinade or boil for several minutes if you plan to reuse it  Eggs: make sure the yolks and whites are firm, not runny, unless using pasteurized eggs

Fresh Fruits and Vegetables

 Rinse surface dirt off raw fruits and vegetables.  Soak raw fruits and vegetables, including those with skins or rinds that will be removed, in water for 2 minutes. Thoroughly rinse fruits and vegetables under running water before eating, peeling, or slicing. Do not use soap, detergents, or bleach solutions.  Use a small vegetable brush to remove remaining surface dirt. Use it only for scrubbing foods. Sanitize the brush between uses.  Cut away damaged or bruised areas. Bacteria can thrive in these places.  At the store, buy produce that is not bruised or damaged. If buying fresh already cut produce, be sure it is refrigerated or surrounded by ice.  At home, chill and refrigerate foods. After purchase, put produce that needs refrigeration away promptly. (Fresh whole produce such as bananas and potatoes do not need refrigeration.) Fresh produce should be refrigerated within 2 hours of peeling or cutting. Leftover cut produce should be discarded if left at room temperature for more than 2 hours.  Don’t cross-contaminate. Use clean cutting boards and utensils when handling fresh produce. If possible, use one clean cutting board for fresh produce and a separate one for raw meat, poultry, and seafood.  During food preparation, wash cutting boards, utensils, or dishes that have come into contact with fresh produce, raw meat, poultry, or seafood.  Do not consume ice that has come into contact with fresh produce or other raw products.  Use a cooler with ice or use ice gel packs when transporting or storing perishable food outdoors, including cut fresh fruits and vegetables.

Raw Sprouts

The FDA offers the following advice about sprouts:  Cook all sprouts thoroughly before eating to reduce the risk of illness.  Sandwiches and salads purchased at restaurants and delicatessens often contain raw sprouts.  When eating away from home, ask that raw sprouts not be added to your food.  Homegrown sprouts also present a health risk, if eaten raw or lightly cooked, and should be avoided.

You may tolerate small, frequent meals more easily than larger meals.  Choose high-calorie foods if you can’t eat much. Things high in the good fats instead of saturated fats include olives, olive oil, nuts and seeds, nut butter (the kind with the oil at the top, not hydrogenated which means saturated), avocados well scrubbed and peeled...combine with starch foods such as rice or pasta or whole grain breads.

You need to drink enough liquid that your urine is pale yellow.

Now, if you are not getting chemotherapy and have other issues, I can give you guidelines on a high protein diet with anti-inflammatory supplements, but there is no one particular diet for bladder cancer, just a diet high in fruits and vegetables for the antioxidants, taking care that if you are receiving chemotherapy you do not get a secondary infection such as from food and remaining hydrated.

Please let me know more about your particular situation, symptoms you are trying to control, if you are on chemotherapy and my answer is satisfactory or if there are other answers you are looking for.

Hope I have answered your query.
Let me know if I can assist you further.

Above answer was peer-reviewed by : Dr. Raju A.T
doctor
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Follow up: Kathy Shattler (4 hours later)
I am not getting chemotherapy. Would you please give me the guidelines on a high protein with anti-inflammatory supplements and include what fruits &
veggies that are high in antioxidants. Also what liquids should I be drinking.
doctor
Answered by Kathy Shattler (16 minutes later)
Brief Answer:
The Mediterrean Diet Plan

Detailed Answer:

Hi,

Since a diet low in fruits, vegetables and fluids has been shown along with tobacco use to be causative agents in bladder cancer, it is the prudent dietary approach in treating bladder cancer to emphasize smoking cessation first and foremost.

To support a healing environment, a diet with 5 servings of fruits and vegetables daily should be consumed with a serving being one fresh fruit, or1/2 cup cooked vegetables or fruit. Fresh fruit and vegetables are higher in antioxidants than cooked.
The highest antioxidants are found in broccoli, blueberries, dark chocolate (not milk chocolate), cranberries, blackberries, cilantro, tomatoes.

Eight to ten glasses of bottled water daily should be consumed. Conflicting data exists as to whether tap water is aggravating to bladder cancer or not.

Green tea, 3-4 cups per day has been found to be helpful if there is no history of kidney stones.

Cranberry juice and the antioxidants phenolic acid, flavonoids and lignans are the best foods for bladder cancer and they are found in fruits, vegetables, legumes like red kidney beans.

A hypoallergenic multi-vitamin is also recommended.

Small, frequent meals consisting of low fat saturated fat, high protein foods is also recommended including nuts, seeds, nut butter, cottage cheese, lean chicken/fish/turkey with a sharp decrease in high fat high saturated sources of fat such as bologna, steak, roasts, fried foods.

Cranberry juice may be consumed freely but watch for too much sugar. Drink no added sugar juices and get fruit servings mostly from fresh or frozen sources.

This is the tenants of a good diet for treating bladder cancer. You may find some foods more irritating than others and just avoid like alcohol, coffee or too much caffeine.

I hope these guidelines help ease the irritations that you are feeling and aide in healing your condition.

Hope I have answered your query.
Let me know if I can assist you further.
Above answer was peer-reviewed by : Dr. Raju A.T
doctor
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Follow up: Kathy Shattler (18 hours later)
Thank you for the list. I appreciate it.
XXXXXXX xxxx
doctor
Answered by Kathy Shattler (6 minutes later)
Detailed Answer:
I do wish you the best of luck with everything.

Hi,

May I kindly ask you to fill out an evaluation for this consult as I can benefit from your feedback and I know HealthcareMagic would appreciate it.

Take Care!

Kathy Shattler,
Dietitian & Nutritionist


Above answer was peer-reviewed by : Dr. Raju A.T
doctor
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Kathy
Kathy Shattler

Dietitian & Nutritionist

Practicing since :1985

Answered : 890 Questions

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Suggest a diet plan for a person undergoing chemotherapy

Detailed Answer: Hello, If you are on chemotherapy, then you are immunocompromised and care should be taken that you do not get food poisoning, thus the recommendation for the "hygienic diet." This nutrition therapy addresses the food safety concerns of individuals whose immunity is suppressed and who are at high risk for foodborne illness. This handout offers guidelines for which foods to eat and which foods to avoid to lower your risk of foodborne illness, tips for how to handle fresh fruits and vegetables, and proper cooking temperatures to keep your food safe to eat. Variations among institutions and physicians may occur, as well as updates with new food safety information. Cooking Foods to Proper Temperatures Proper cooking temperatures kill harmful bacteria present in food. Use a meat thermometer to check when meat, poultry, seafood, and dishes containing eggs are done cooking. The USDAFDA recommends safe minimum internal temperatures for numerous foods, which are listed below.  Beef, veal, pork, lamb: 145°F (allow to rest 3 minutes before carving or eating)  Poultry: 165°F  Ground beef, veal, pork, lamb: 160°F  Ground poultry: 165°F  Casseroles, egg dishes: 160°F  Fin fish: 145°F or until opaque flesh flakes with a fork  Scallops: cook until flesh is milky white or opaque and firm  Shrimp, lobster, and crab: cook until they turn red and the flesh is pearly and opaque  Clams, oysters, and mussels: cook until shells open during cooking  Leftovers: reheat to at least 165°F  Deli-style meats and hot dogs: reheat until steaming hot or 165°F  Soups, gravies, and sauces: bring to a boil  Meat marinade: discard marinade or boil for several minutes if you plan to reuse it  Eggs: make sure the yolks and whites are firm, not runny, unless using pasteurized eggs Fresh Fruits and Vegetables  Rinse surface dirt off raw fruits and vegetables.  Soak raw fruits and vegetables, including those with skins or rinds that will be removed, in water for 2 minutes. Thoroughly rinse fruits and vegetables under running water before eating, peeling, or slicing. Do not use soap, detergents, or bleach solutions.  Use a small vegetable brush to remove remaining surface dirt. Use it only for scrubbing foods. Sanitize the brush between uses.  Cut away damaged or bruised areas. Bacteria can thrive in these places.  At the store, buy produce that is not bruised or damaged. If buying fresh already cut produce, be sure it is refrigerated or surrounded by ice.  At home, chill and refrigerate foods. After purchase, put produce that needs refrigeration away promptly. (Fresh whole produce such as bananas and potatoes do not need refrigeration.) Fresh produce should be refrigerated within 2 hours of peeling or cutting. Leftover cut produce should be discarded if left at room temperature for more than 2 hours.  Don’t cross-contaminate. Use clean cutting boards and utensils when handling fresh produce. If possible, use one clean cutting board for fresh produce and a separate one for raw meat, poultry, and seafood.  During food preparation, wash cutting boards, utensils, or dishes that have come into contact with fresh produce, raw meat, poultry, or seafood.  Do not consume ice that has come into contact with fresh produce or other raw products.  Use a cooler with ice or use ice gel packs when transporting or storing perishable food outdoors, including cut fresh fruits and vegetables. Raw Sprouts The FDA offers the following advice about sprouts:  Cook all sprouts thoroughly before eating to reduce the risk of illness.  Sandwiches and salads purchased at restaurants and delicatessens often contain raw sprouts.  When eating away from home, ask that raw sprouts not be added to your food.  Homegrown sprouts also present a health risk, if eaten raw or lightly cooked, and should be avoided. You may tolerate small, frequent meals more easily than larger meals.  Choose high-calorie foods if you can’t eat much. Things high in the good fats instead of saturated fats include olives, olive oil, nuts and seeds, nut butter (the kind with the oil at the top, not hydrogenated which means saturated), avocados well scrubbed and peeled...combine with starch foods such as rice or pasta or whole grain breads. You need to drink enough liquid that your urine is pale yellow. Now, if you are not getting chemotherapy and have other issues, I can give you guidelines on a high protein diet with anti-inflammatory supplements, but there is no one particular diet for bladder cancer, just a diet high in fruits and vegetables for the antioxidants, taking care that if you are receiving chemotherapy you do not get a secondary infection such as from food and remaining hydrated. Please let me know more about your particular situation, symptoms you are trying to control, if you are on chemotherapy and my answer is satisfactory or if there are other answers you are looking for. Hope I have answered your query. Let me know if I can assist you further.