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Dr. Andrew Rynne
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Dr. Andrew Rynne

Family Physician

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Medication for severe trauma?

Answered by
Dr.
Dr. Sudhir Kumar

Neurologist

Practicing since :1994

Answered : 5904 Questions

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Posted on Tue, 11 Mar 2014 in Brain and Spine
Question: Hello. I'm writing on behalf of my 82 year old mother. She's had a progressively deteriorating ability to speak..struggling find the right words. Exhaustive tests have been done (including a brain MRI) which have all come back negative for anything like stroke, tumor or other brain disease. She is in otherwise excellent health. After doing some research online, I stumbled upon Aphasia (Expressive or Anomic seem to fit the bill). I believe this is what my Mom has. I'm interested to see if I'm on the right path here. Although my mom never had a stroke, she has been through severe trauma over the past few years over the death of my Dad. Any thoughts?
doctor
Answered by Dr. Sudhir Kumar 6 hours later
Brief Answer: I agree with your suspicion. Detailed Answer: Hi, Thank you for posting your query. I agree with your suspicion that your mother could be suffering from a condition known as primary progressive aphasia. In this condition, the person loses ability to comprehend and speak and the condition continues to deteriorate over time. This is a degenerative process, similar to Alzheimer's disease, but unlike Alzheimer's disease, other symptoms of dementia are not seen (such as memory impairment, ability to take self care, finding way at home or outside calculation ability, etc). PET (positron emission tomography) may help in finding out the areas of brain affected, as PET scan shows the function of brain. This would help in confirming the diagnosis to a certain extent. Unfortunately, there are no medications to cure it or stop the progression. Speech therapy may help partly. I hope it helps. Please get back if you have any follow up queries. Best wishes, Dr Sudhir XXXXXXX MD DM (Neurology) XXXXXXX Consultant Neurologist
Above answer was peer-reviewed by : Dr. Chakravarthy Mazumdar
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Follow up: Dr. Sudhir Kumar 22 hours later
Thank you, Dr XXXXXXX for your insight. We will follow up with a local neurologist & suggest a P.E.T. scan to confirm. You've been most helpful.
doctor
Answered by Dr. Sudhir Kumar 1 hour later
Brief Answer: Thank you. Detailed Answer: Please keep me informed about her progress. Best wishes, Dr Sudhir XXXXXXX MD DM (Neurology)
Above answer was peer-reviewed by : Dr. Chakravarthy Mazumdar
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