question-icon

Is vaginal bleeding after menopause symptom of cervical cancer?

default
Posted on Mon, 3 Mar 2014
Question: Hi Dr. I might have cervical cancer....my gyn is setting up an ultrasound...I think I need a gyn oncologist. my symptons are vaginal bleeding after menopause.
doctor
Answered by Dr. Madhuri N Bagde (26 minutes later)
Brief Answer: Conditions other than cancer can cause bleeding Detailed Answer: Hi, I understand your concern as well as the alarm. I am glad that you have sought medical help and I am sure you will get over this. Post menopausal vaginal bleeding is definitely a cause of concern. There are various causes for this. However the commonest cause is not cancer but usually senile endometritis or atrophic endometritis or senile vaginitis. All of these occur due to low estrogen levels causing the genital tissue to shrink and bleed as it does not get the support it needs for growth. Other causes are uterine and cervical cancer. All of the above present with post menopausal bleeding. If you are suspicious that you may be having a cervical cancer, the following are better ways to diagnose this rather than an ultrasound: The first step is direct examination of the cervix by your gynec to look for any lesion. Further procedures are 1. cervical cytology: In this cells from the cervix are collected and examined under a microscope to check for cancerous cells. This can be done as an outpatient procedure by your gynec. 2. Visual inspection of the cervix using colposcopy and a colposcopically directed biopsy. This will be done by your gynec. 3. open biopsy of the cervix without a colposcope if any growth is visible. 4. a cervical biopsy along with a dilatation and curettage or endometrial biopsy to rule out endometrial cancer. An ultrasound will be eventually needed to determine the status of the cervix and uterus and any other coexisting pathology. I suggest that you discuss the best suitable procedure with your gynecologist and I am always here to help. Your concern and alarm are understandable. But remember that the commonest cause is not cancer but lack of hormonal support leading to bleeding. So I suggest that you please wait and stop worrying until all the investigations are done. Do not worry and all my good wishes are with you and I wish you will get over this smoothly. Hope I was able to address your query. Feel free to ask any more. Thanks for using XXXXXXX Have a nice day. Dr Madhuri Bagde
Above answer was peer-reviewed by : Dr. Vaishalee Punj
doctor
default
Follow up: Dr. Madhuri N Bagde (11 minutes later)
Thank you. I will.
doctor
Answered by Dr. Madhuri N Bagde (7 minutes later)
Brief Answer: Take care Detailed Answer: Take care
Above answer was peer-reviewed by : Dr. Vaishalee Punj
doctor
Answered by
Dr.
Dr. Madhuri N Bagde

OBGYN

Practicing since :2001

Answered : 1390 Questions

premium_optimized

The User accepted the expert's answer

Share on
Is vaginal bleeding after menopause symptom of cervical cancer?

Brief Answer: Conditions other than cancer can cause bleeding Detailed Answer: Hi, I understand your concern as well as the alarm. I am glad that you have sought medical help and I am sure you will get over this. Post menopausal vaginal bleeding is definitely a cause of concern. There are various causes for this. However the commonest cause is not cancer but usually senile endometritis or atrophic endometritis or senile vaginitis. All of these occur due to low estrogen levels causing the genital tissue to shrink and bleed as it does not get the support it needs for growth. Other causes are uterine and cervical cancer. All of the above present with post menopausal bleeding. If you are suspicious that you may be having a cervical cancer, the following are better ways to diagnose this rather than an ultrasound: The first step is direct examination of the cervix by your gynec to look for any lesion. Further procedures are 1. cervical cytology: In this cells from the cervix are collected and examined under a microscope to check for cancerous cells. This can be done as an outpatient procedure by your gynec. 2. Visual inspection of the cervix using colposcopy and a colposcopically directed biopsy. This will be done by your gynec. 3. open biopsy of the cervix without a colposcope if any growth is visible. 4. a cervical biopsy along with a dilatation and curettage or endometrial biopsy to rule out endometrial cancer. An ultrasound will be eventually needed to determine the status of the cervix and uterus and any other coexisting pathology. I suggest that you discuss the best suitable procedure with your gynecologist and I am always here to help. Your concern and alarm are understandable. But remember that the commonest cause is not cancer but lack of hormonal support leading to bleeding. So I suggest that you please wait and stop worrying until all the investigations are done. Do not worry and all my good wishes are with you and I wish you will get over this smoothly. Hope I was able to address your query. Feel free to ask any more. Thanks for using XXXXXXX Have a nice day. Dr Madhuri Bagde