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Is it possible to get HIV through handjob?

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Posted on Thu, 26 Dec 2013
Question: Hi Dr. I was engaging in protected vaginal sex with an unknown partner. Due to nervousness I was unable to ejaculate. I then removed my penis from her vagina and she started giving me a hand job. While doing this she removed the used condom with her hand and then used the same hand to give me a hand job. Iam now worried as the condom might have contained some of her vaginal fluid and this may have gone to her hand and then to my penis. Is it possible that she could have transmitted hiv to me through this route? Please let me know if I am at risk. Thank you
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Answered by Dr. Roopa Hiremath (2 hours later)
Brief Answer: HIV transmission, Exposure Code and Status Code Detailed Answer: Hi Mr. XXXXXXX Thanks for choosing health care magic for your query. I understand your concern regarding exposure to HIV. I want to elaborate on few details about HIV transmission and risk of exposure to relieve your anxiety. HIV is Human Immunodeficiency Virus which is mainly transmitted by sexual route (oral, vaginal or anal) The semen and vaginal fluids are rich in HIV particles in an HIV infected individual. HIV gains entry into the body through the mucosa of the genitalia and reaches the local lymph nodes and multiplies there. Then it spills into the blood 4-11 days after exposure. Now coming to your episode, you are doubtful that you have been exposed to the vaginal fluid of an individual whose HIV status is not known. Your risk can be evaluated based on something called exposure code and status code. Exposure code is of three types EC1, EC2 and EC3 depending on the following: 1. Type of exposure - exposure to blood, body fluid or instrument contaminated with HIV infected blood or body fluid. 2. Intact skin or compromised skin and mucous membrane 3. Percutaneous exposure If less volume of body fluid/blood has come in contact with intact skin then it is EC1. (Least risk) If large volume of body fluid/blood has come in contact with compromised skin or mucous membrane, then it is EC2. (Relative risk) Percutaneous exposure - needle prick with needle used by HIV infected patient, then it is EC3. (Maximum risk) Status code is also of three types SC1, SC2 and SC Unknown. Status code is determined depending on the HIV status of the individual you are exposed to. SC1 - HIV status positive, asymptomatic. (relative risk) SC2 - HIV status positive, symptomatic patient with symptoms of AIDS. (maximum risk) SC Unknown - HIV status unknown. (depends on exposure code) Based on details in your query, your exposure code is EC1 and status code is SC unknown which puts you in the least risk group. I have tried to simplify the strategy used to determine risk of exposure as much as possible. If you have any more clarifications, please do not hesitate to get back. Thanks.
Above answer was peer-reviewed by : Dr. Chakravarthy Mazumdar
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Answered by
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Dr. Roopa Hiremath

Infectious Diseases Specialist

Practicing since :2002

Answered : 877 Questions

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Is it possible to get HIV through handjob?

Brief Answer: HIV transmission, Exposure Code and Status Code Detailed Answer: Hi Mr. XXXXXXX Thanks for choosing health care magic for your query. I understand your concern regarding exposure to HIV. I want to elaborate on few details about HIV transmission and risk of exposure to relieve your anxiety. HIV is Human Immunodeficiency Virus which is mainly transmitted by sexual route (oral, vaginal or anal) The semen and vaginal fluids are rich in HIV particles in an HIV infected individual. HIV gains entry into the body through the mucosa of the genitalia and reaches the local lymph nodes and multiplies there. Then it spills into the blood 4-11 days after exposure. Now coming to your episode, you are doubtful that you have been exposed to the vaginal fluid of an individual whose HIV status is not known. Your risk can be evaluated based on something called exposure code and status code. Exposure code is of three types EC1, EC2 and EC3 depending on the following: 1. Type of exposure - exposure to blood, body fluid or instrument contaminated with HIV infected blood or body fluid. 2. Intact skin or compromised skin and mucous membrane 3. Percutaneous exposure If less volume of body fluid/blood has come in contact with intact skin then it is EC1. (Least risk) If large volume of body fluid/blood has come in contact with compromised skin or mucous membrane, then it is EC2. (Relative risk) Percutaneous exposure - needle prick with needle used by HIV infected patient, then it is EC3. (Maximum risk) Status code is also of three types SC1, SC2 and SC Unknown. Status code is determined depending on the HIV status of the individual you are exposed to. SC1 - HIV status positive, asymptomatic. (relative risk) SC2 - HIV status positive, symptomatic patient with symptoms of AIDS. (maximum risk) SC Unknown - HIV status unknown. (depends on exposure code) Based on details in your query, your exposure code is EC1 and status code is SC unknown which puts you in the least risk group. I have tried to simplify the strategy used to determine risk of exposure as much as possible. If you have any more clarifications, please do not hesitate to get back. Thanks.