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Is Carbidopa the same as Levodopa?

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Posted on Thu, 17 Nov 2016
Question: I have a second prescription for Carbidopa/levidopa which has different lettering on the pills. Are they the same medicine ?

The first one has 539 on one side and a stylized R on the other side and is slightly larger than
the other pills which have the letter M with a line below it and CL2 below the line and the other side is blank








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Answered by Dr. Dariush Saghafi (45 minutes later)
Brief Answer:
Generic medications come from different manufacturers

Detailed Answer:
Good afternoon. Thank you for your question.

You can easily get more details from your pharmacist who sold you or filled your prescription. However, since you purchased GENERIC carbidopa/levodopa then, what happens is that the pharmacy will provide pills from the batch that they have in stock which comes from a different manufacturer or distributor than let's say a batch they received last month from which you may've gotten the first prescription.

In theory, the drugs/chemicals should be identical and therefore, they should work the same way. However, in reality some people find that different generic prescriptions from one manufacturer work differently from pills obtained from a different manufacturer. The numbers and lettering you mention are just identification codes that specify from where the tablets/pills come from in case they would need to be tracked.

If you are looking for something that gives much more consistent results in terms of how you feel and what you should expect to feel when taking the medication then, you could always ask your doctor to write DAW on the prescription that goes to the pharmacy. The trouble with that is that most insurance carriers will not cover BRAND NAME drugs unless there is no generic in existence for that medication and even then, you will likely need to have a special situation medically whereby some existing generic wouldn't be able to theoretically treat you as well as the brand name.

At any rate, theoretically both batches of prescriptions you received should function the same. Let your pharmacist know about any problems you may experience with the medications because they can sometimes order batches of certain medications directly from certain manufacturers if they know that their patients are particularly happy with the results of the pill.

If I've adequately answered your questions could you do me a huge favor by CLOSING THE QUERY and being sure to include some fine words of feedback along with a 5 STAR rating if you feel my suggestions have helped? Again, many thanks for posing your questions and please let me know how things turn out.

Do not forget to contact me in the future at: www.bit.ly/drdariushsaghafi for additional questions, comments, or concerns having to do with this topic or others.

This query has utilized a total of 18 minutes of professional time in research, review, and synthesis for the purpose of formulating a return statement.

Above answer was peer-reviewed by : Dr. Chakravarthy Mazumdar
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Answered by
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Dr. Dariush Saghafi

Neurologist

Practicing since :1988

Answered : 2474 Questions

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Is Carbidopa the same as Levodopa?

Brief Answer: Generic medications come from different manufacturers Detailed Answer: Good afternoon. Thank you for your question. You can easily get more details from your pharmacist who sold you or filled your prescription. However, since you purchased GENERIC carbidopa/levodopa then, what happens is that the pharmacy will provide pills from the batch that they have in stock which comes from a different manufacturer or distributor than let's say a batch they received last month from which you may've gotten the first prescription. In theory, the drugs/chemicals should be identical and therefore, they should work the same way. However, in reality some people find that different generic prescriptions from one manufacturer work differently from pills obtained from a different manufacturer. The numbers and lettering you mention are just identification codes that specify from where the tablets/pills come from in case they would need to be tracked. If you are looking for something that gives much more consistent results in terms of how you feel and what you should expect to feel when taking the medication then, you could always ask your doctor to write DAW on the prescription that goes to the pharmacy. The trouble with that is that most insurance carriers will not cover BRAND NAME drugs unless there is no generic in existence for that medication and even then, you will likely need to have a special situation medically whereby some existing generic wouldn't be able to theoretically treat you as well as the brand name. At any rate, theoretically both batches of prescriptions you received should function the same. Let your pharmacist know about any problems you may experience with the medications because they can sometimes order batches of certain medications directly from certain manufacturers if they know that their patients are particularly happy with the results of the pill. If I've adequately answered your questions could you do me a huge favor by CLOSING THE QUERY and being sure to include some fine words of feedback along with a 5 STAR rating if you feel my suggestions have helped? Again, many thanks for posing your questions and please let me know how things turn out. Do not forget to contact me in the future at: www.bit.ly/drdariushsaghafi for additional questions, comments, or concerns having to do with this topic or others. This query has utilized a total of 18 minutes of professional time in research, review, and synthesis for the purpose of formulating a return statement.