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How is a vagus nerve stimulation procedure done?

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Posted on Thu, 26 Nov 2015
Question: What is a vague nerve stimulator? Please go in depth with how the procedure goes? What kind of medicines are involved? And how it works? I am not quite sure never heard of it I do have seizures I know that is part of it i am just very curious before I get it my doctor did not give much detail is it worth the nerve stimulator I've had up to 2 or 3 seizures per week that I busted my head open
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Answered by Dr. Erion Spaho (1 hour later)
Brief Answer:
It uses a electrical device, not drugs.

Detailed Answer:
Hello and thanks for using HCM.

I have read your question and understand your concerns.

I assume you mean vagus nerve stimulation, right?

It is a procedure that uses electrical impulses (not medicines) to stimulate vagus nerve and is used as an alternative treatment option to treat seizures (partial seizures) when other treatments (drugs) haven't worked.

It is also used as a possible treatment about depression (hard to treat depression).

As per procedure, the electrical device is surgically implanted under the skin on the chest. A wire is threaded under the skin connecting the device to the left vagus nerve. When activated, the device sends electrical signals along the vagus nerve to the brainstem, and through the brainstem to other areas of the brain inhibiting their abnormal function.

So, if you experience partial seizures that are uncontrollable by drugs (one drug alone or in combination), you may be a candidate for vagus nerve stimulation.

All these issues should be discussed with your Neurologist.

Hope you found the answer helpful.

Let me know if I can assist you further.

Greetings.
Above answer was peer-reviewed by : Dr. Neel Kudchadkar
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Follow up: Dr. Erion Spaho (4 hours later)
I have V /a shunt is that compatible or would it cause a problem VA stand for ventricular atrial so I'm just wondering if that would cause an interference with that so I if not I would consider it but if it's going to cause a problem I don't even want to consider it please answer in pleaserror answer in depth thank you very much
sorry I meant to say reflash a stand for ventriculo atrial
doctor
Answered by Dr. Erion Spaho (25 hours later)
Brief Answer:
Follow up.

Detailed Answer:
Welcome back.

Ventricular atrial shunt doesn't use any electricity, so, doesn't interfere with vagus nerve stimulation.

Anatomically speaking also, both two surgical procedures doesn't interfere with each other.

So, if after discussing with your Neurologist your condition and you result eligible for vagus nerve stimulation, ventricular atrial shunt is not a contraindication.

Hope this helps.

Best regards.
Above answer was peer-reviewed by : Dr. Neel Kudchadkar
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Answered by
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Dr. Erion Spaho

Neurologist, Surgical

Practicing since :2004

Answered : 4300 Questions

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How is a vagus nerve stimulation procedure done?

Brief Answer: It uses a electrical device, not drugs. Detailed Answer: Hello and thanks for using HCM. I have read your question and understand your concerns. I assume you mean vagus nerve stimulation, right? It is a procedure that uses electrical impulses (not medicines) to stimulate vagus nerve and is used as an alternative treatment option to treat seizures (partial seizures) when other treatments (drugs) haven't worked. It is also used as a possible treatment about depression (hard to treat depression). As per procedure, the electrical device is surgically implanted under the skin on the chest. A wire is threaded under the skin connecting the device to the left vagus nerve. When activated, the device sends electrical signals along the vagus nerve to the brainstem, and through the brainstem to other areas of the brain inhibiting their abnormal function. So, if you experience partial seizures that are uncontrollable by drugs (one drug alone or in combination), you may be a candidate for vagus nerve stimulation. All these issues should be discussed with your Neurologist. Hope you found the answer helpful. Let me know if I can assist you further. Greetings.