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How Effective Is The Brain Cognitive Test In Assessing Risk Of Dementia?

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Posted on Wed, 29 Jul 2015
Question: Whats your opinion on the food for the brain cognitive test developed by XXXXXXX scientists. http://cft3.foodforthebrain.org/

I scored in the "at risk" range for mci which was one sd below the mean. I did another online test the memtrax and scored 100% which was "very good". I dont understand the discrepancies between my scores. Ive done the ravlt before and scored very highly but this new score worries me
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Answered by Dr. Ajay Panwar (2 hours later)
Brief Answer:
Its does screening to some extent,in some domains.

Detailed Answer:
Hi XXXX,
Thanks for being on healthcaremagic.com.
I am Dr.Ajay Panwar,a neurologist,here to answer your query.

I have seen the profile of this cognitive test.It tests some of your cognitive domains based on visual stimulus.
First of all,it does not test all the domains for classifying a patient to have Dementia .It does not test- Fund of knowledge,memory,all aspects of language.What it tests is-some components of language based on visual input like complex figures.

There are reasons for which one can easily get low scores on this-
1)Even a normal person can show at risk considering the complexities in the advanced sections of the test.
2)Some may not know the dictionary words for some objects/instruments correctly.

Clinical tests are much more valid and realistic for Dementia evaluation.Even,MMSE(Mini mental scoring examination) gets a much better impression.
Further,any dementia test is only valid if patient has symptoms.In complex figures formation,I have seen many normal persons failing-that does not mean all of them were having dementia.Clinics came first,then the tests.

So,I don't see any reason to worry just because you scored low here.Absolutely not.

Hope that I have answered your query.If you have some further questions,I shall be glad to answer else please close the thread,rate it and write a review as your rating will be of help to me.

Regards
Dr.Ajay Panwar,
MD,DM(Neurology)
Above answer was peer-reviewed by : Dr. Yogesh D
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Answered by
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Dr. Ajay Panwar

Neurologist

Practicing since :2007

Answered : 1827 Questions

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How Effective Is The Brain Cognitive Test In Assessing Risk Of Dementia?

Brief Answer: Its does screening to some extent,in some domains. Detailed Answer: Hi XXXX, Thanks for being on healthcaremagic.com. I am Dr.Ajay Panwar,a neurologist,here to answer your query. I have seen the profile of this cognitive test.It tests some of your cognitive domains based on visual stimulus. First of all,it does not test all the domains for classifying a patient to have Dementia .It does not test- Fund of knowledge,memory,all aspects of language.What it tests is-some components of language based on visual input like complex figures. There are reasons for which one can easily get low scores on this- 1)Even a normal person can show at risk considering the complexities in the advanced sections of the test. 2)Some may not know the dictionary words for some objects/instruments correctly. Clinical tests are much more valid and realistic for Dementia evaluation.Even,MMSE(Mini mental scoring examination) gets a much better impression. Further,any dementia test is only valid if patient has symptoms.In complex figures formation,I have seen many normal persons failing-that does not mean all of them were having dementia.Clinics came first,then the tests. So,I don't see any reason to worry just because you scored low here.Absolutely not. Hope that I have answered your query.If you have some further questions,I shall be glad to answer else please close the thread,rate it and write a review as your rating will be of help to me. Regards Dr.Ajay Panwar, MD,DM(Neurology)