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Hello, I Don’t Know If I Am Asking The Correct

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Posted on Tue, 28 Jul 2020
Question: Hello,
I don’t know if I am asking the correct medical specialty this question but this is it:

My father in the UK ( I am in Australia) had a ruptured aortic aneurism 7 weeks ago today.
He was operated on successfully (open surgery, not an endvar), 4 days later his wound was weeping (they already knew he had an infection) went back to theatre and removed large bowel, so now has a stoma. I ‘m aware since then he has had a catheter in place, which I thought was to do with his kidney function, he was on dialysis for a couple of weeks, but is no longer, his kidney function is now 30.

So I thought the catheter was to monitor the output, but when I spoke to a nurse earlier this week, she said it wasn’t and may be in for a week or 2 more or may go home with it.
My mother either doesn’t know or won’t tell me why the catheter is still In place.
When I called the hospital again and spoke to a different nurse, all she would say is that he can’t evacuate urine.

I am really concerned about this, as I don’t want him to end up with a stoma and a catheter for the rest of his life
He is in his early seventies and was perfectly healthy and active before the triple AAA.
I know he had the normal elderly man issue of having to get up to urinate at night, but I believe he had the normal prostate screening process that elderly men have.

So my question why would he still have a catheter in place and is it likely to be permanent.?
XXXXXXX
doctor
Answered by Dr. Aaron Branch (36 minutes later)
Brief Answer:
Most likely temporary

Detailed Answer:
Hello, I'm Dr. Branch, thanks for using 'Ask a Doctor'. I'm sorry to hear your father has had these major health issues. I think it is good that you are being vigilant about your father's care and trying to make sure everything is being done the best that it can be. Placing a urinary catheter is commonly done for patient in your father's condition. Especially for older males, there are often already bladder issues related to an enlarged prostate, and even without any prior issues, the stress of surgery and possibly pain medications given afterwards can make it harder for the bladder to function well. You are right that urinary catheters are sometimes used to monitor urine output, but at this point, at least part of the reason may be due to the feeling that his bladder may not be ready to work like before. Fortunately, this is typically a temporary condition (related to the surgery and pain medications), and usually a "bladder trial" (in which they remove the catheter and see how he does with urinating by himself) can be done within a few weeks.

I hope that helps, please let me know if you have any other questions about that, and I would be glad to discuss it with you further.
Above answer was peer-reviewed by : Dr. Kampana
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Answered by
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Dr. Aaron Branch

General & Family Physician

Practicing since :2011

Answered : 1177 Questions

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Hello, I Don’t Know If I Am Asking The Correct

Brief Answer: Most likely temporary Detailed Answer: Hello, I'm Dr. Branch, thanks for using 'Ask a Doctor'. I'm sorry to hear your father has had these major health issues. I think it is good that you are being vigilant about your father's care and trying to make sure everything is being done the best that it can be. Placing a urinary catheter is commonly done for patient in your father's condition. Especially for older males, there are often already bladder issues related to an enlarged prostate, and even without any prior issues, the stress of surgery and possibly pain medications given afterwards can make it harder for the bladder to function well. You are right that urinary catheters are sometimes used to monitor urine output, but at this point, at least part of the reason may be due to the feeling that his bladder may not be ready to work like before. Fortunately, this is typically a temporary condition (related to the surgery and pain medications), and usually a "bladder trial" (in which they remove the catheter and see how he does with urinating by himself) can be done within a few weeks. I hope that helps, please let me know if you have any other questions about that, and I would be glad to discuss it with you further.