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Having Bifascicular block and BP. Done with nuclear stress test. Advise?

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Posted on Wed, 18 Sep 2013
Question: I have a bi fascicular block.

A a BP issue.

I did a nuclear stress and the report came negative.

It mentioned no inducible ischemia

How can i know whether my RCA and LCA are ok ?

I do have lot of colour photos from the test

How about the bi fascicular block root cause ?
can we do something proactive about this ?
doctor
Answered by Dr. Anantharamakrishnan (5 hours later)
Brief Answer:
Only follow up needed

Detailed Answer:
Hi friend,
Welcome to Health Care Magic

     Bifascicular block – It is affliction of conduction system... / Usual cause is degenerative disease / occasionally ischemia and so on... / If there are no symptoms, and the ECHOcardiogram and TMT are normal, need to do nothing but follow up... Advanced techniques of investigations of increasing complexity are available – Electro Physiological Studies (EPS) > it resembles angio – a catheter is put inside the heart / electrical activity recorded / stimulation and suppression tests are carried out / suitable medicine tested and so on. Though the test is the gold standard, it is INVASIVE and is not generally done unless there are compelling indications. This super-speciality expert is called ELECTRO-PHYSIOLOGIST

     Nuclear stress test is the ideal non-invasive way to evaluate ischemia / to assess the PHYSIOLOGY (function) – to see whether the blood arriving at the heart muscle. If negative, nothing to do! If positive, the next step is to see the ANATOMY (structure) – undergo catheterisation and coronary angiography with a view for possible intervention. It is the only way to directly ‘see’ the block, if any – and its location, extent, severity and so on. Coronary arteriography is invasive but it is the gold standard for this. CT angio is non-invasive study for the anatomy. If positive, you will need catheterisation, anyway.

The treating doctor may suggest them depending on need, based on his assessment of the situation.

Take care     
Wishing speedy recovery
God bless
Good luck

Above answer was peer-reviewed by : Dr. Chakravarthy Mazumdar
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Answered by
Dr.
Dr. Anantharamakrishnan

Cardiologist

Practicing since :1966

Answered : 4505 Questions

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Having Bifascicular block and BP. Done with nuclear stress test. Advise?

Brief Answer:
Only follow up needed

Detailed Answer:
Hi friend,
Welcome to Health Care Magic

     Bifascicular block – It is affliction of conduction system... / Usual cause is degenerative disease / occasionally ischemia and so on... / If there are no symptoms, and the ECHOcardiogram and TMT are normal, need to do nothing but follow up... Advanced techniques of investigations of increasing complexity are available – Electro Physiological Studies (EPS) > it resembles angio – a catheter is put inside the heart / electrical activity recorded / stimulation and suppression tests are carried out / suitable medicine tested and so on. Though the test is the gold standard, it is INVASIVE and is not generally done unless there are compelling indications. This super-speciality expert is called ELECTRO-PHYSIOLOGIST

     Nuclear stress test is the ideal non-invasive way to evaluate ischemia / to assess the PHYSIOLOGY (function) – to see whether the blood arriving at the heart muscle. If negative, nothing to do! If positive, the next step is to see the ANATOMY (structure) – undergo catheterisation and coronary angiography with a view for possible intervention. It is the only way to directly ‘see’ the block, if any – and its location, extent, severity and so on. Coronary arteriography is invasive but it is the gold standard for this. CT angio is non-invasive study for the anatomy. If positive, you will need catheterisation, anyway.

The treating doctor may suggest them depending on need, based on his assessment of the situation.

Take care     
Wishing speedy recovery
God bless
Good luck