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Does inversion therapy help cure severe lower back pain?

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Posted on Fri, 18 Aug 2017
Question: I have just received a diagnosis of Lumbar vertebrae #4 or #5 having arthritic destruction and causing
Compression (pinching) of my sciatic nerve. There is severe lower back pain and significant difficulty
Sitting, standing, or walking. My already high BP has been elevated in response.
Question: Is an inversion therapy board the only way to help the inflammation reduce by making the
Vertebrae withdraw from the sciatic nerve pressure? If so, how many hours per day must I use it?
Question #2: Is the healing timetable weeks, months, or years?
Thank you, Mrs. XXXXXXX King
doctor
Answered by Dr. Olsi Taka (3 hours later)
Brief Answer:
Read below.

Detailed Answer:
I read your question carefully and I understand your concern.

Inversion therapy is not the only therapy and it is not a first line therapy either. Actually if you have heart issues there may be some safety concerns about it.

Physical therapy is the only approved method which has a long lasting benefits. It aims to strengthen spine muscles in order to relieve the load on the vertebrae.
If not enough injections are commonly used, injecting steroid anti-inflammatories and analgesics, locally at the site of the inflammation.

If those do not work then surgery may be considered as a last resort.

As for the timetable, that varies, most people (about 80%) improve spontaneously inside 4-6 weeks, but there can be pain recurrences (which is also why physical therapy is important, to prevent those).

I remain at your disposal for other questions.
Above answer was peer-reviewed by : Dr. Chakravarthy Mazumdar
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Answered by
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Dr. Olsi Taka

Neurologist

Practicing since :2004

Answered : 3674 Questions

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Does inversion therapy help cure severe lower back pain?

Brief Answer: Read below. Detailed Answer: I read your question carefully and I understand your concern. Inversion therapy is not the only therapy and it is not a first line therapy either. Actually if you have heart issues there may be some safety concerns about it. Physical therapy is the only approved method which has a long lasting benefits. It aims to strengthen spine muscles in order to relieve the load on the vertebrae. If not enough injections are commonly used, injecting steroid anti-inflammatories and analgesics, locally at the site of the inflammation. If those do not work then surgery may be considered as a last resort. As for the timetable, that varies, most people (about 80%) improve spontaneously inside 4-6 weeks, but there can be pain recurrences (which is also why physical therapy is important, to prevent those). I remain at your disposal for other questions.