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Does intake of Promethazine help in treating personality disorder?

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Posted on Fri, 27 May 2016
Question: Many thanks for your last message, much appreciated. I have read the section on explaining what you are specialised in. Unfortunately I have been diagnosed with the following:
Depression
Generalised Anxiety disorder
Borderline Personality Disorder and
Dependent Personality Disorder.

I am really after any information you can give me about promethazine. What it is used for? What, in your opinion has the doctor from the Personality Disorder Community Team suggested for me for? Side effects I should watch out for while I/my body is getting used to it? Anything that anyone who spends time with me needs to look out for symptom wise?

Sorry to ask you so many questions. But as I have got the next 2 weeks of medication already I have got at least 2 weeks to find out what I can about this medication to harm myself with information, so I know what I am dealing with when I do officially start taking it.

Also, on information, I have read about it so far, it suggests to take this medication as and when needed, I don't think that is going to work for me. Obviously I will go to speak to the pharmacy staff who deal with my medication, but as a second opinion, how often should I take it?
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Answered by Dr. Alexander H. Sheppe (1 hour later)
Brief Answer:
Private Consultation

Detailed Answer:
Hello, and thanks so much for utilizing my direct private service. I now consider you my private patient, and will do absolutely everything I can to help you in every way.

Promethazine is a versatile medication that is used in many ways, due to its effects on many receptors in the brain (dopamine, histamine, acetylcholine, serotonin). It can act as a mood stabilizer, an anti-allergy medication, an anti-nausea medication, a sleep medication, and an anti-anxiety medication. I suspect given your history that it is being used as an as-needed anti-anxiety medication, or perhaps as a medication to help you sleep at night.

This medication has side effects you should be aware of. It can cause you to feel very sleepy, so the dose may need to be adjusted (lowered) if this happens. It can also cause low blood pressure, dizziness, dry mouth, and urinary retention. These are the most common things I would look out for.

In terms of dosing, I would take 12.5 no more than three times daily. This can be increased if needed to higher doses, but I always start with the lowest dose first to avoid side effects.

Please feel free to ask any and all followup questions you may have.

Dr. Sheppe
Above answer was peer-reviewed by : Dr. Naveen Kumar
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Answered by
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Dr. Alexander H. Sheppe

Psychiatrist

Practicing since :2014

Answered : 2242 Questions

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Does intake of Promethazine help in treating personality disorder?

Brief Answer: Private Consultation Detailed Answer: Hello, and thanks so much for utilizing my direct private service. I now consider you my private patient, and will do absolutely everything I can to help you in every way. Promethazine is a versatile medication that is used in many ways, due to its effects on many receptors in the brain (dopamine, histamine, acetylcholine, serotonin). It can act as a mood stabilizer, an anti-allergy medication, an anti-nausea medication, a sleep medication, and an anti-anxiety medication. I suspect given your history that it is being used as an as-needed anti-anxiety medication, or perhaps as a medication to help you sleep at night. This medication has side effects you should be aware of. It can cause you to feel very sleepy, so the dose may need to be adjusted (lowered) if this happens. It can also cause low blood pressure, dizziness, dry mouth, and urinary retention. These are the most common things I would look out for. In terms of dosing, I would take 12.5 no more than three times daily. This can be increased if needed to higher doses, but I always start with the lowest dose first to avoid side effects. Please feel free to ask any and all followup questions you may have. Dr. Sheppe