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Dr. Andrew Rynne
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Dr. Andrew Rynne

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Can head trauma cause memory loss?

Answered by
Dr.
Dr. Dariush Saghafi

Neurologist

Practicing since :1988

Answered : 2429 Questions

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Posted on Sun, 31 Mar 2019 in Brain and Spine
Question: Can head trauma cause memory loss?
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Follow up: Dr. Dariush Saghafi 0 minute later
Can head trauma cause memory loss?
doctor
Answered by Dr. Dariush Saghafi 1 hour later
Brief Answer:
Head trauma can certainly lead to memory loss even if NOT severe

Detailed Answer:
Hello and thank you for your question on the relationship between head trauma and memory loss.

I suppose it really depends on the INTENSITY of the TRAUMA to the head. Typically, when most people talk about trauma they are referring to a forceful blow to the head from some external source causing some degree of injury or damage to brain tissue. More common terms might be CONCUSSIVE or TRAUMATIC BRAIN INJURY. It has been shown that the younger the individual suffering the concussive injury the more apt they are to suffer from memory problems even at milder intensities compared to older children. Older children seem to be a bit more resilient to concussions of the milder type but when the degree of injury is raised from very mild or mild to something more on the moderate to severe degree of damage then, memory loss can be profound and permanent. More recent studies looked at the time threshold of confusion and disorientation following a concussion or traumatic brain injury even of the VERY MILD VARIETY and found that if the individual was not yet back to full alertness within 5 minutes that the chance of more severe damage was greater compared to individuals in whom disorientation or confusion turned out to be less than 5 minutes or even in individuals in which NO CHANGE IN ALERTNESS OCCURRED at all.

NOTE: If no change in the status of alertness occurs after a head trauma then, it is technically NOT a CONCUSSION nor a TRAUMATIC BRAIN INJURY. It is simply a blow or trauma to the head.

Therefore, to answer your question and based on this particular study by Lovell et al from XXXXXXX 2003 in the Journal of Neurosurgery TRAUMAS to the head that are not considered to be concussions or TRAUMATIC BRAIN INJURIES themselves can result in memory losses and the effect of this sort of event is MAGNIFIED in younger children than in older ones. It is also magnified in the intensity of memory loss when a change in mental status is greater than 5 minutes compared to cases where changes in mentation go on for LESS than 5 minutes or do not exist at all.

And so, if I've provided useful or helpful information to your question could you do me the utmost of favors in not forgetting to CLOSE THE QUERY along with a few POSITIVE words of feedback and maybe even a 5 STAR rating if you feel it is deserving? I am definitely interested in getting updated information on how things are going in the next few weeks if you'd drop me a line at: www.bit.ly/drdariushsaghafi

You can always reach me at that address for this or other questions. I wish you the best with everything and hope this information does help you.

This query required 25 minutes of professional time to research, assimilate, and respond in complete form.


Above answer was peer-reviewed by : Dr. Chakravarthy Mazumdar
doctor
doctor
Answered by Dr. Dariush Saghafi 0 minute later
Brief Answer:
Head trauma can certainly lead to memory loss even if NOT severe

Detailed Answer:
Hello and thank you for your question on the relationship between head trauma and memory loss.

I suppose it really depends on the INTENSITY of the TRAUMA to the head. Typically, when most people talk about trauma they are referring to a forceful blow to the head from some external source causing some degree of injury or damage to brain tissue. More common terms might be CONCUSSIVE or TRAUMATIC BRAIN INJURY. It has been shown that the younger the individual suffering the concussive injury the more apt they are to suffer from memory problems even at milder intensities compared to older children. Older children seem to be a bit more resilient to concussions of the milder type but when the degree of injury is raised from very mild or mild to something more on the moderate to severe degree of damage then, memory loss can be profound and permanent. More recent studies looked at the time threshold of confusion and disorientation following a concussion or traumatic brain injury even of the VERY MILD VARIETY and found that if the individual was not yet back to full alertness within 5 minutes that the chance of more severe damage was greater compared to individuals in whom disorientation or confusion turned out to be less than 5 minutes or even in individuals in which NO CHANGE IN ALERTNESS OCCURRED at all.

NOTE: If no change in the status of alertness occurs after a head trauma then, it is technically NOT a CONCUSSION nor a TRAUMATIC BRAIN INJURY. It is simply a blow or trauma to the head.

Therefore, to answer your question and based on this particular study by Lovell et al from XXXXXXX 2003 in the Journal of Neurosurgery TRAUMAS to the head that are not considered to be concussions or TRAUMATIC BRAIN INJURIES themselves can result in memory losses and the effect of this sort of event is MAGNIFIED in younger children than in older ones. It is also magnified in the intensity of memory loss when a change in mental status is greater than 5 minutes compared to cases where changes in mentation go on for LESS than 5 minutes or do not exist at all.

And so, if I've provided useful or helpful information to your question could you do me the utmost of favors in not forgetting to CLOSE THE QUERY along with a few POSITIVE words of feedback and maybe even a 5 STAR rating if you feel it is deserving? I am definitely interested in getting updated information on how things are going in the next few weeks if you'd drop me a line at: www.bit.ly/drdariushsaghafi

You can always reach me at that address for this or other questions. I wish you the best with everything and hope this information does help you.

This query required 25 minutes of professional time to research, assimilate, and respond in complete form.


Above answer was peer-reviewed by : Dr. Chakravarthy Mazumdar
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The User accepted the expert's answer

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