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Are elevated sugar levels, heart palpitations and hypertension signs of PFO?

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Posted on Thu, 3 Mar 2016
Question: Recently had a 2D Echo & Doppler study - it showed trace aortic & pulmonic valve regurgitation; moderate mitral & tricuspid valve regurgitation. Left & Right Atrium both mildly enlarged, mild left ventricular diastolic dysfunction, right ventricular systolic pressure is estimated at 40 mmHg therefore there is mild pulmonary hypertension; probable PFO is present. I have high blood pressure and recently high cholesterol, heart disease in my family & I am very overweight. The cardiologist wanted me to have a stress test but when I go to his office my BP gets too high. Normally it is about 130/80. A few weeks ago I started getting a sort of flipflop feeling in my chest, sort of like a palpitation. I was working a lot & under a lot of stress getting ready for the holidays. It lasted over 2 weeks and then stopped as suddenly as it came on XXXXXXX 8th. Yesterday it started again. I am now hosting 2 parties this weekend and again working hard and getting stressed - I suffer from anxiety/panic attacks & depression. I want to think that the palpitations are from my nerves but with my history I am scared this can be something really bad.
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Answered by Dr. Meriton Siqeca (40 minutes later)
Brief Answer:
Probably the panic atracks

Detailed Answer:
Hello, madame. Welcome to HCM and thank you for your question. I understand your concern.

Well, there are certain physiological states that can increase the heart beat and, therefore, produce premature beats (hence the palpotations). These include: physical activity, psychological stress, caffeine-containing beverages, hormonal changes etc. During panic attacks, there is an increased release of adrenalin and noradrenalin, which, in turn, increase the heart beat and may produce premature beats, which are accompanied with palpitations. My opinion is that there is nothing to worry about and you should enjoy the upcoming parties. However, if this has become a worrisome phenomenon to you, I would recommend a consult with a psychiatrist or a clinical psychologist, to further determine a short course treatment with anxiety-relievers, such as benzodiazepines.

As for the findings in the echocardiogram,
it is recommended by guidelines and by my personal experience, that a 2D echo cardiogram should be carried out every one year, referring to your age, and there is nothing to worry about at the moment.

I hope I was helpful with my answer. Please close the discussion and rate the answer, if you do not have follow-up questions. If you do, I would be happy to help.

Wish you all the best,
Dr. Meriton
Above answer was peer-reviewed by : Dr. Prasad
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Dr. Meriton Siqeca

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Practicing since :2009

Answered : 773 Questions

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Are elevated sugar levels, heart palpitations and hypertension signs of PFO?

Brief Answer: Probably the panic atracks Detailed Answer: Hello, madame. Welcome to HCM and thank you for your question. I understand your concern. Well, there are certain physiological states that can increase the heart beat and, therefore, produce premature beats (hence the palpotations). These include: physical activity, psychological stress, caffeine-containing beverages, hormonal changes etc. During panic attacks, there is an increased release of adrenalin and noradrenalin, which, in turn, increase the heart beat and may produce premature beats, which are accompanied with palpitations. My opinion is that there is nothing to worry about and you should enjoy the upcoming parties. However, if this has become a worrisome phenomenon to you, I would recommend a consult with a psychiatrist or a clinical psychologist, to further determine a short course treatment with anxiety-relievers, such as benzodiazepines. As for the findings in the echocardiogram, it is recommended by guidelines and by my personal experience, that a 2D echo cardiogram should be carried out every one year, referring to your age, and there is nothing to worry about at the moment. I hope I was helpful with my answer. Please close the discussion and rate the answer, if you do not have follow-up questions. If you do, I would be happy to help. Wish you all the best, Dr. Meriton