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Are antibiotics the right medication for lingual tonsillitis?

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Posted on Tue, 26 May 2015
Question: I was in major pain every time I swallowed and my ENT checked with a camera and said I have lingual tonsilitis and a infected vallecular cyst, five days ago. He gave me a shot of antibiotics and put me on antibiotics 3x a day for 21 days. The pain (still tender to swallow) has improved but it seems like my voice and ability to swallow has gotten much worse and I am really worried. I called him back and he said to just continue with the antibiotics and see him in a week and a half. This doesn't make sense to me as from what I've read the antibiotics wont make it go away and it will need to be surgically removed also the fact that I'm having such a hard time swallowing. Thank you.
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Answered by Dr. Muhammad Ahmad (40 minutes later)
Brief Answer:
Surgery

Detailed Answer:
Hi,

Welcome to Health Care Magic, Thanks for writing to us,

I am Dr.Muhammad Ahmad, I have read your question, I understand your concern and will try to help you in the best possible way.

Your history and description of symptoms tells me that your problem is going in the right direction and it is getting better.

As far as your voice is concerned i second opinion of your doctor that it will get better if infection goes.

Thing is simple, the infection damages structures around it like vocal cords, inner throat , trachea etc, so it pains when you swallow and your voice has gone bad.

As the infection settles down , inflammation will decrease , you voice box will loosen up and things will get better.

Regarding surgery, I would like to share with you that first line of treatment is medicine, surgery has it's own risk and there is a particular criteria according to which patients needing surgery are selected.

Even if you are a candidate of surgery according to the criteria still your infection will need to be controlled before that can operate on you.

They won't operate on an infected tonsil filled with germs and pus, taking risk of spreading pus and germs in the blood sending it to whole body.

So, surgery or no surgery, medical treatment has to be taken.

So i would suggest you to be patient and see how things proceed with medication. Be regular with your meds and precautions things will keep getting better.



....

I Hope this answers your question, if your have more queries feel free to ask, otherwise close the discussion and rate it. Wish you the best of health.



Regards,

Dr.Muhammad Ahmad.

M.B.B.S.

Resident M.D.

Above answer was peer-reviewed by : Dr. Chakravarthy Mazumdar
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Follow up: Dr. Muhammad Ahmad (8 minutes later)
I think you may have missed the question the whole problem is a vallecular cyst not tonsils, I have no regular tonsils or adnoids I believe the lingual tonsilitis is from the cyst. The question/problem is that I can barely swallow due to the cyst on my epiglotis hence the voice eating drinking swallowing etc issues, I don't see anywhere where this cyst and it's associated problems would be cured with antibiotics.
doctor
Answered by Dr. Muhammad Ahmad (7 minutes later)
Brief Answer:
Surgery inn infected are means big risks

Detailed Answer:
Hello,

Thanks for writing back,

Respected mam I didn't miss the issue, vallecular cyst is nothing new 90% of them are since birth and your symptoms started now. These are because of the Infection of tonsils infection.

A cyst being there for 30 years wont suddenly cause an infection of tonsils, it's the tonsil you have to cure to make your symptoms better.

Yes treatment of cyst is surgery but again your have to weight risks and benefits, one can't do a surgery on all the inflamed infected areas,

Antibiotics will cure the infection which will reduce the inflammation in the area, reducing the risk of surgical complications then the doctor can think or operating your tonsil and cyst.

He he operated in an area around infection, your surgery wont will get nothing but an infection and it will get even more complicated so curing infection first is the right way to go.

I would suggest you to be patient , take your meds and hopefully things will get better.

Regards.

Dr.Muhammad Ahmad



Above answer was peer-reviewed by : Dr. Chakravarthy Mazumdar
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Answered by
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Dr. Muhammad Ahmad

General & Family Physician

Practicing since :2012

Answered : 1308 Questions

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Are antibiotics the right medication for lingual tonsillitis?

Brief Answer: Surgery Detailed Answer: Hi, Welcome to Health Care Magic, Thanks for writing to us, I am Dr.Muhammad Ahmad, I have read your question, I understand your concern and will try to help you in the best possible way. Your history and description of symptoms tells me that your problem is going in the right direction and it is getting better. As far as your voice is concerned i second opinion of your doctor that it will get better if infection goes. Thing is simple, the infection damages structures around it like vocal cords, inner throat , trachea etc, so it pains when you swallow and your voice has gone bad. As the infection settles down , inflammation will decrease , you voice box will loosen up and things will get better. Regarding surgery, I would like to share with you that first line of treatment is medicine, surgery has it's own risk and there is a particular criteria according to which patients needing surgery are selected. Even if you are a candidate of surgery according to the criteria still your infection will need to be controlled before that can operate on you. They won't operate on an infected tonsil filled with germs and pus, taking risk of spreading pus and germs in the blood sending it to whole body. So, surgery or no surgery, medical treatment has to be taken. So i would suggest you to be patient and see how things proceed with medication. Be regular with your meds and precautions things will keep getting better. .... I Hope this answers your question, if your have more queries feel free to ask, otherwise close the discussion and rate it. Wish you the best of health. Regards, Dr.Muhammad Ahmad. M.B.B.S. Resident M.D.