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What is the exact relationship between pulse rate and systolic pressure ?

What is the exact relationship between pulse rate and systolic pressure? There is a precise mathematical relationship between pulse rate and systolic pressure. What is it? Oh, but there is......I assure you. Thank you Adtrav...but it s not what I m looking for. I am asking for the exact, precise algebraically-expressible relationship . Rocky - I ll let you know what it is at the end of the session. Adtrav: Max. Ps is intra-ventriclar @ systole, declining as the P gradient extends down the aortal/arteriolar section of the loop. At the interface of the arteriolar bed and the capillaries, the pressure gradient driving blood through the load (capillaries and veinous system) downstream is the weighted mean pressure, comprising principally the diastolic pressure at that point. The pressure here is essentially non-pulsatile and steady. Fairly irrelevant to the question, -but I thought you might like to know. Angie, ...are you really, REALLY calling Rocky Radtrav fools? And you an RN? Mago, thank you for your contribution and advice. I take it that you too are unaware of the relationship? It s been staring you, the medical profession, in the face for a hundred years, and all I m doing is pointing it out. It s not a theory, nor hypothesis. It is merely recognising a direct mathematical relationship which exists but which you have failed to observe and acknowledge. Hi Sami, ..Good to read you again. -always constructive and polite. Sadly, one can t answer one s own question. The format doesn t allow it. If I write a Reply Yahoo Sends an OOPS! message. But sadly, I have to disagree with you on systolic and pulse rate. For any cardiac work level, lowering the pulse rate ineluctably must raise systolic pressure. Would you like me to email you a clinical results graph showing this? Regards, Tich Oh. P.S. Sami, - I could send you the equation by plain e.mail if you wish? I d quite forgotten that. Tich Dr.Earp. Thank you for your kind reply, but the question refers to Systolic Pressure, not Mean pressure. The equation you cite is the Mean Pressure Equation.
Asked On : Fri, 18 Dec 2009
Answers:  5 Views:  1046
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  User's Response
During shock pulse is fast and systolic blood pressure is low. After a beta blocker is administered pulse is slow and systolic blood pressure is low again. Probably within narrow limits , for a given volume of pulse, rate and systolic pressure are directly proportional to each other Please answer the question yourself to enlighten us.
Answered: Sat, 19 Dec 2009
  User's Response

whar is correlation between very low systolic reading sa low heart rate?

Answered: Tue, 9 Feb 2010
  User's Response

what is correlation between low systolic reading and low heart rate

Answered: Tue, 9 Feb 2010
  User's Response

what is correlation between low systolic reading and low heart rate

Answered: Tue, 9 Feb 2010
  User's Response

what is correlation between low systolic reading and low heart rate

Answered: Tue, 9 Feb 2010
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