Get your Health question answered in 3 easy steps
A Doctor will be with you shortly
Ask a Doctor Now
144 Doctors are Online

What is PID?

What is PID? Pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) is a general term that refers to infection of the uterus (womb), fallopian tubes (tubes that carry eggs from the ovaries to the uterus) and other reproductive organs. It is a common and serious complication of some sexually transmitted diseases (STDs), especially chlamydia and gonorrhea. PID can damage the fallopian tubes and tissues in and near the uterus and ovaries. PID can lead to serious consequences including infertility, ectopic pregnancy (a pregnancy in the fallopian tube or elsewhere outside of the womb), abscess formation, and chronic pelvic pain. How common is PID? Each year in the United States, it is estimated that more than 1 million women experience an episode of acute PID. More than 100,000 women become infertile each year as a result of PID, and a large proportion of the ectopic pregnancies occurring every year are due to the consequences of PID. How do women get PID? PID occurs when bacteria move upward from a woman's vagina or cervix (opening to the uterus) into her reproductive organs. Many different organisms can cause PID, but many cases are associated with gonorrhea and chlamydia, two very common bacterial STDs. A prior episode of PID increases the risk of another episode because the reproductive organs may be damaged during the initial bout of infection. Sexually active women in their childbearing years are most at risk, and those under age 25 are more likely to develop PID than those older than 25. This is partly because the cervix of teenage girls and young women is not fully matured, increasing their susceptibility to the STDs that are linked to PID. The more sex partners a woman has, the greater her risk of developing PID. Also, a woman whose partner has more than one sex partner is at greater risk of developing PID, because of the potential for more exposure to infectious agents. Women who douche may have a higher risk of developing PID compared with women who do not douche. Research has shown that douching changes
Asked On : Sat, 6 Dec 2008
Answers:  2 Views:  1073
Report Abuse
Share on Facebook
Share on Twitter
Share on Google+
Question is related to
Medical Topics
  User's Response
What is the treatment? The treatment of PID is by antibiotics. Ciprofloxacin and metronidazole are the most commonly used medicines. Painkillers, such as ibuprofen and diclofenac, are often required. In severe acute cases the patient may need hospitalisation and treatment with intravenous antibiotics. In less severe cases, patients may be treated on outpatient basis with oral antibiotics. Antibiotic treatment is usually given for 7-10 days. Chronic cases may need treatment for longer periods. Local treatment can be effective, with the use of vaginal pessaries containing antibiotics and anti-fungal agents. Patients resistant to treatment may have collections of pus in the pelvic cavity. These patients may require laparoscopy, which helps in diagnosis, rules out other conditions as well as allows aspiration of the pus. In very severe illness, not responding to high dose antibiotics, an open operation may be needed to remove the uterus (hysterectomy).
Answered: Sat, 20 Dec 2008
  User's Response
PID is one of the commonest cause of the Female infertility ... Which can be cured easily #####
Answered: Thu, 18 Dec 2008
Disclaimer: These answers are for your information only and not intended to replace your relationship with your treating physician.
This is a short, free answer. For a more detailed, immediate answer, try our premium service [Sample answer]


Loading Online Doctors....
© Ebix, Inc. All Rights Reserved.
All the information, content and live chat provided on the site is intended to be for informational purposes only, and not a substitute for professional or medical advice. You should always speak with your doctor before you follow anything that you read on this website. Any health question asked on this site will be visible to the people who browse this site. Hence, the user assumes the responsibility not to divulge any personally identifiable information in the question. Use of this site is subject to our Terms & Conditions
Already Rated.
Your rating:

Ask a Doctor