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What is LDL & HDL ?

what is LDL,HDL ?
Asked On : Fri, 11 Dec 2009
Answers:  2 Views:  1213
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  User's Response
Cholesterol is a waxy fat that is present in all human beings. About 80 percent of the cholesterol in the body is manufactured by the liver. The rest is consumed through cholesterol-rich foods such as meat, eggs and dairy products. Cholesterol is carried through the bloodstream by proteins called apolipoproteins. When these proteins wrap around cholesterol and other types of fats (lipids), the resulting “packages” are called lipoproteins. There are five types of lipoproteins: High-density lipoproteins (HDL), which are associated with “good” cholesterol. Low-density lipoproteins (LDL), which are associated with “bad” cholesterol. Very-low-density lipoproteins (VLDL), which are associated with "very bad" cholesterol. Intermediate-density lipoproteins. Like VLDLs, these also carry triglycerides and cholesterol. Chylomicrons, which carry only a small percentage of cholesterol. Chylomicrons are mostly rich in another type of fat called triglycerides. Total cholesterol levels less than 200 are desirable. Total cholesterol levels between 200 and 239 are borderline-high. Total cholesterol levels that are 240 or higher are high. HDL levels of less than 40 for men and 50 for women are considered low, and levels of 60 or more are considered protective against heart disease. HDL levels should be 40 or above (the American College of Cardiology recommends levels of 45 or above for women. LDL levels should optimally be less than 100 (levels greater than 129 are considered borderline-high, and levels greater than 159 are considered high). These are the basic details. (You should be aware that there is controversy about this subject regarding "good" & "bad" cholesterol http://www.thegreatcholesterol I add two links that discusses this subject wiki/Low_density_lipoprotein wiki/High_density_lipoprotein Hope this helps Matsdor 89
Answered: Fri, 11 Dec 2009
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Answered: Thu, 16 Jun 2011
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