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Had oral sex. Redness in genitals. STI?

Hi I had a guy give me oral sex early february, he really concentrated on the tip of my penis and it didn't feel comfortable. Everything was fine til about beginning to mid march when tip of my penis felt sore to touch, i can't really say if it looks different, maybe a bit red. Is it possible I caught an STI? I still have soreness it hasn't gona away.
Asked On : Fri, 19 Apr 2013
Answers:  2 Views:  34
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Diseases and Conditions
Dermatologist 's  Response
Dec 2013
Hi,
Welcome and thanks for posting your query to HCM.
After reading your query we can make out that the problem begun at around 40-45 days of oral sex ( from early February to mid March). Correlating your problem of soreness only, there is no possibility of any of the STI's after those 45 days of period. STI's generally manifest as either some ulcer or papule over penis with inguinal lymph node swelling with or without some systemic symptoms, which are not there in yourself. There might be rare possibility of candidal balanoposthitis, but then wouldn't had been only on the tip.
Now the pain might be due to simple trauma which induced soreness at the tip. So rest assured the problem of soreness will subside in due course of time. For bit early relief you can take painkillers and can do simple saline compression.
Hope to give you the best of the information.
With best health wishes,
Dr Sanjay K Kanodia
MD ( Dermatology and STD/ Venereology)
Answered: Sat, 20 Apr 2013
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Ayurveda Specialist Dr. Packriswamy Sambangi's  Response
Hi,
STIs caused by viruses or bacteria that like warm , soft, moist places such as your mouth and genital area.
STIs can spread from the genital area to the mouth and from the mouth to the genital area. They are generally passed between people via body fluids or direct contact with skin or sores.
Though there's admittedly less risk of STIs in oral sex than in vaginal or anal sex, the risk still exists.
Herpes is commonly passed between genitals and the mouth and HIV can be passed through cuts in the mouth or small abrasions.
If you are planning to have oral sex, know how to make it safer by avoiding the exchanges of bodily fluids and other risky contact
Answered: Fri, 19 Apr 2013
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