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Feeling little pain in my heart

i m 28 years old man feeling little pain in my heart for last 1 and 1 i m 28 years old man, feeling little pain in my heart for last 1 and 1/2 years. Sometimes i also feel uneasy to breathe, sometimes i feel pain in my back, neck and shoulders. i visited a doctor for ECG test but he says i m healthy. After which test can i come to know if i have no heart disease?
Asked On : Mon, 24 Jan 2011
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Thoracic Surgeon 's  Response
you can get stress test & 2 d echo done to rule out heart disease.& find other causes of chest pain.Chest pain is one of the most frightening symptoms a person can have. It is sometimes difficult even for a doctor or other medical professional to tell what is causing chest pain and whether it is life-threatening.

Any part of the chest can be the cause of the pain including the heart, lungs, esophagus, muscle, bone, and skin.

Because of the complex nerve distribution in the body, chest pain may actually originate from another part of the body.

The stomach or other organs in the belly (abdomen), for example, can cause chest pain.
Potentially life-threatening causes of chest pain are as follows:

Heart attack (acute myocardial infarction): A heart attack occurs when blood flow to the arteries that supply the heart (coronary arteries) becomes blocked. With decreased blood flow, the muscle of the heart does not receive enough oxygen. This can cause damage, deterioration, and death of the heart muscle.

Angina: Angina is chest pain related to an imbalance between the oxygen demand of the heart and the amount of oxygen delivered via the blood. It is caused by blockage or narrowing of the blood vessels that supply blood to the heart. Angina is different from a heart attack in that the arteries are not completely blocked, and it causes little or no permanent damage to the heart. "Stable" angina occurs repetitively and predictably while exercising and goes away with rest. "Unstable" angina results in unusual and unpredictable pain not relieved totally by rest, or pain that actually occurs at rest.

Aortic dissection: The aorta is the main artery that supplies blood to the vital organs of the body, such as the brain, heart, kidneys, lungs, and intestines. Dissection means a tear in the inner lining of the aorta. This can cause massive internal bleeding and interrupt blood flow to the vital organs.

Pulmonary embolism: A pulmonary embolus is a blood clot in one of the major blood vessels that supplies the lungs. It is a potentially life-threatening cause of chest pain but is not associated with the heart.

Spontaneous pneumothorax: Often called a collapsed lung, this condition occurs when air enters the saclike space between the chest wall and the lung tissue. Normally, negative pressure in the chest cavity allows the lungs to expand. When a spontaneous pneumothorax occurs, air enters the chest cavity. When the pressure balance is lost, the lung is unable to re-expand. This cuts off the normal oxygen supply in the body.

Perforated viscus: A perforated viscus is a hole or tear in the wall of any area of the gastrointestinal tract. This allows air to enter the abdominal cavity, which irritates the diaphragm, and can cause chest pain.

Cocaine-induced chest pain: Cocaine causes the blood vessels in the body to constrict. This can decrease blood flow to the heart, causing chest pain. Cocaine also accelerates the progression of atherosclerosis, a risk factor for a heart attack.
Causes of chest pain that are not immediately life-threatening include the following:

Acute pericarditis: This is an inflammation of the pericardium, which is the sac that covers the heart.

Mitral valve prolapse: Mitral valve prolapse is an abnormality of one of the heart valves in which the "leaves" of the valve bulge into the upper heart chamber during contraction. When this occurs, a small amount of blood flows backward in the heart. This is believed by some to be a cause of chest pain in certain people, although this has not been proven with certainty.

Pneumonia: Pneumonia is an infection of the lung tissue. Chest pain occurs because of inflammation to the lining of the lungs.

Disorders of the esophagus: Chest pain from esophageal disorders can be an alarming symptom because it often mimics chest pain from a heart attack.

Acid reflux disease (gastroesophageal reflux disease, GERD, heartburn) occurs when acidic digestive juices flow backward from the stomach into the esophagus. The resulting heartburn is sometimes experienced as chest pain.

Esophagitis is an inflammation of the esophagus.

Esophageal spasm is defined as excessive, intensified, or uncoordinated contractions of the smooth muscle of the esophagus.

Costochondritis: This is an inflammation of the cartilage between the ribs. Pain is typically located in the mid-chest, with intermittently dull and sharp pain that may be increased with deep breaths, movement, and deep touch.

Herpes zoster: Also known as shingles, this is a reactivation of the viral infection that causes chickenpox. With shingles, a rash occurs, usually only on one small part of the body. The pain, often very severe, is usually confined to the area of the rash. The pain may precede the rash by 4-7 days. Risk factors include any condition in which the immune system is compromised, such as advanced age, HIV, or cancer. Herpes zoster is highly contagious to people who have not had chickenpox or have not been vaccinated against chickenpox for the five days before and the five days after the appearance of the rash.
Answered: Tue, 25 Jan 2011
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