Get your Health question answered in 3 easy steps
A Doctor will be with you shortly
Ask a Doctor Now
134 Doctors are Online

Bleeding after urinating, severe pain, not sexually active. Causes for symptoms?

Okay well I went to the bathroom about 5 something and I was peeing and it lasted about 3 seconds but I noticed at the end there was blood and it feel like I got to go every 30 seconds and when I go I be for a second and the rest is blood then it starts to hurt...... what does this mean and I haven t had sex in 2 months
Asked On : Wed, 13 Mar 2013
Answers:  3 Views:  51
Report Abuse
Share on Facebook
Share on Twitter
Share on Google+
Critical Care Specialist 's  Response
Hello
Welcome to heath care magic
Dear patient, persence of blood in urine or after urination is called haematuria, it is causes by a number of conditions like urinary tract infection (UTI) stones in urinary tract, benign prostatic hypertrophy, prostatitis, uretheritis, cystitis, tumours in urinary tract etc. cause usually depends up on the age and sex of the patient, pain full haematuria is usually seen in UTI and stones in urinary tract and painless haematuria is usually due to tumours in urinary tract. you consult a doctor who will get your tests done like haemogram, urine for routine and microscopy, X-RAY KUB, USG whole abdomen and other necessary tests to find out thecause of haematuria and will give you treatment accordingly. plenty of fluids taken oralley will help you
thanks
Dr Arshad
Answered: Wed, 13 Mar 2013
I find this answer helpful
Critical Care Specialist Dr. Arshad Hussain's  Response
Hello
Welcome to heath care magic
Dear patient, persence of blood in urine or after urination is called haematuria, it is causes by a number of conditions like urinary tract infection (UTI) stones in urinary tract, benign prostatic hypertrophy, prostatitis, uretheritis, cystitis, tumours in urinary tract etc. cause usually depends up on the age and sex of the patient, pain full haematuria is usually seen in UTI and stones in urinary tract and painless haematuria is usually due to tumours in urinary tract. you consult a doctor who will get your tests done like haemogram, urine for routine and microscopy, X-RAY KUB, USG whole abdomen and other necessary tests to find out thecause of haematuria and will give you treatment accordingly. plenty of fluids taken oralley will help you
thanks
Dr Arshad
Answered: Wed, 13 Mar 2013
I find this answer helpful
General & Family Physician Dr. Gopal Krishnam Raju's  Response
causes of your problem::
Trauma: › Exercise-induced (resolves with rest)
› Abdominal trauma and/or pelvic fracture with renal, bladder, or ureteral injury
› Iatrogenic from abdominal or pelvic surgery; chronic indwelling catheters
› Foreign body, physical/sexual abuse
• Neoplasms: › Malignancies: 30% of adult patients with painless, gross hematuria and ~10% with painless microscopic hematuria have a malignancy (2). Urothelial carcinoma of the bladder and renal tumors are of greatest concern in adults.
› Benign tumors
› Endometriosis of the urinary tract (suspect in females with cyclic hematuria)
• Inflammatory causes: › UTI: Most common cause of hematuria in adults
› Renal diseases: Radiation nephritis, radiation cystitis, acute and chronic tubulointerstitial nephritis (due to drugs, infections, systemic disease)
› Glomerular disease: – Goodpasture syndrome (antiglomerular basement membrane disease; autoimmune; associated pulmonary hemorrhage)
– IGA nephropathy
– Lupus nephritis
– Henoch-Schönlein purpura
– Membranoproliferative, poststreptococcal, or rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis
– Wegener granulomatosis
› Endocarditis/visceral abscesses
› Other infections: Schistosomiasis, TB, syphilis
• Metabolic causes: › Calculus disease (85% of patients have hematuria): – Hypercalciuria: A common cause of both gross and microscopic hematuria in children (1)
– Hyperuricosuria
• Congenital/Familial causes: › Cystic disease: Polycystic kidney disease, solitary renal cyst
› Benign familial hematuria or thin basement membrane nephropathy (autosomal dominant)
› Alport syndrome (X-linked in 85%; hematuria, proteinuria, hearing loss, corneal abnormalities) (4)
› Fabry disease (X-linked recessive inborn error of metabolism; vascular kidney disease)
› Nail-patella syndrome (autosomal dominant; nail and patella hypoplasia; hematuria in 33%)
Renal tubular acidosis type 1 (autosomal dominant or autoimmune)
• Hematologic causes: › Bleeding dyscrasias (e.g., hemophilia)
› Sickle cell anemia/trait (renal papillary necrosis)
• Vascular causes: › Hemangioma
› Arteriovenous malformations (rare)
› Nutcracker syndrome: Compression of left renal vein and subsequent renal parenchymal congestion
› Renal artery/vein thrombosis
› Arterial emboli to kidney
• Chemical causes: › Nephrotoxins: Aminoglycosides, cyclosporine
› Other drugs: Analgesics, oral contraceptives, Chinese herbs
• Obstruction: › Strictures or posterior urethral valves
› Hydronephrosis, from any cause
› Benign prostatic hyperplasia: Rule out other causes of hematuria.
Answered: Wed, 13 Mar 2013
I find this answer helpful
Disclaimer: These answers are for your information only and not intended to replace your relationship with your treating physician.
This is a short, free answer. For a more detailed, immediate answer, try our premium service [Sample answer]
 

 

Loading Online Doctors....
© Ebix, Inc. All Rights Reserved.
All the information, content and live chat provided on the site is intended to be for informational purposes only, and not a substitute for professional or medical advice. You should always speak with your doctor before you follow anything that you read on this website. Any health question asked on this site will be visible to the people who browse this site. Hence, the user assumes the responsibility not to divulge any personally identifiable information in the question. Use of this site is subject to our Terms & Conditions
Already Rated.
Your rating:

Ask a Doctor