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What is the possibility of alopecia areata turning into alopecia totalis?

DOCTOR OF THE MONTH - Dec 2013
Dec 2013
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Dermatologist
Practicing since : 2002
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Daer sir, Iam facing alopacia areata, from last one month i did not observe any new patch, iam taking medication(injections) from a doctor, will my alopecia areata coverts to alopecia totalis, what is the possibility? pl help me out
Posted Sat, 1 Feb 2014 in Skin Hair and Nails
 
 
Answered by Dr. Sanjay Kumar Kanodia 1 hour later
Brief Answer: kindly see the suggestions below Detailed Answer: Hi, Welcome and thanks for posting your query to XXXXXXX After reading your query with complete diligence and analyzing the picture with the history I can very well reassure you that there are negligible chances or frankly say your alopecia areata will not turn into alopecia totalis. To tell you simply: Alopecia areata is an autoimmune condition where due to formation of antibodies to the hair roots, there is temporary damage to the hair roots. Till now we are not able to find the exact cause of formation these antibodies. These antibodies persist for few weeks to few month sof period. As soon as the antibodies are getting down by self or by medications the hair growth again reverts to normal. In your case you gave the history of alopecia areata from one month and presently you are on medication with no new patch of hair loss depicts halted activity of the auto-antibodies. Adding to this the patches are showing activity of hair growth in center which is a very good sign in terms of hair growth and therefore is a good prognostic sign that it will no turn into alopecia totalis. Had these patches were not showing any sign of improvement despite the treatment for 6 months and persisted for longer than a year period with formation of new patches all over scalp and other areas of body then could had been the chances of the alopecia totalis. So lose your worries and take proper follow up with your doctor. In next 8-12 weeks of period you will be quite alright. I hope these information's will help you. If you have further queries I will be happy to help. "Wish you good health" Regards, Dr Sanjay Kumar Kanodia MD (Dermatology )
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Follow-up: What is the possibility of alopecia areata turning into alopecia totalis? 59 minutes later
My dermatologist suggested Verdeso (desonide) foam , 0.05% emulsion formulation for topical use on scalp regularly along with corticosteroid injections once in a month. My concerns are 1. We are planning for children and will it effect in that scenario? I am asking this question because my wife's doctors asked for some hormonal tests for my wife and they came ok, so he suggested me to go for siemen analysis test...2. Is the Verdeso helps to re grow hair on my scalp....
 
 
Answered by Dr. Sanjay Kumar Kanodia 11 minutes later
Brief Answer: To the point and perfect treatment Detailed Answer: Hello young man, Welcome again to the forum and thanks for your further follow up. Regarding your further queries: Your doctor has given a perfect treatment to give you earliest relief without any side effects. All the medication are to the point and totally safe and will not hamper semen quality and hence in planning your baby. Desonide is one of the mildest of steroid which we use in even newborn children too. It is not absorbed internally and never ever can cause any problem. It is one of the simplest medication which can be used for regrowing the hair and calming down your auto-antibodies locally. For corticosteroid injections too- we use triamcinolone injection again in very very low dose of 2-5 mg/ml. Once a month is the minimum possible dose which can be given. Again it is totally safe and nothing to be worried about your future plannings. I hope these information will help you. If you have any further queries I will be glad to help or if you do not then can close the query and rate the answer. Enjoy the weekend and the forthcoming new year ahead with best of health and wealth. Regards, Dr Sanjay Kumar Kanodia MD (Dermatology)
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Follow-up: What is the possibility of alopecia areata turning into alopecia totalis? 13 days later
In future will this repeat (loosing hair aspatches) what is the %
 
 
Answered by Dr. Sanjay Kumar Kanodia 9 hours later
Brief Answer: Your alopecia is not progressive Detailed Answer: Hi, Thanks for your follow up. Let you understand that alopecia areata does not destroy hair follicles, and the potential for regrowth of hair is retained for many years, and is possibly life long. In some patients, patches of hair loss occur at infrequent intervals interspersed with long periods of normal hair growth. But ultimately the hair rows in most of the patients. Only less than 1-2 % of patients has tendency of alopecia to be persistent, so that new patches of hair loss continue to develop at the same time as regrowth occurs elsewhere. In a relatively less than 1 % of patients, hair loss progresses to involve all of the scalp (alopecia totalis) or the entire skin surface (alopecia universalis). I have already given you the facts that your alopecia is not progressive and accordingly you can also get relaxed because of above facts. In my experience 35-50% of patients recover within 6months to 1 year spontaneously without any treatment and more than 90% of patients with proper treatment. In yourself as you have already started with treatment so you have a very good prognosis. The prognosis is less favorable when onset occurs during childhood and in ophiasis (loss of hair form back of scalp near neck area). The concurrence of atopic disease or any other skin disease has been reported to be associated with a poor prognosis. In yourself there is no such evidence so you should relax totally about your condition. You relax and do not worry, you will be alright soon. DO take your medicines properly. I hope these information will help you. If you have any further queries I will be glad to help or if you do not then can close the query and rate the answer. Regards, Dr Sanjay Kumar Kanodia MD (Dermatology)
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Follow-up: What is the possibility of alopecia areata turning into alopecia totalis? 8 hours later
Thank u sooooooooomuch.....this is the last question, we r trying for second child what is the possibility of getting this to new born child and my first child who is 5 years old....i read some where that it is a heriditary , is it correct?
 
 
Answered by Dr. Sanjay Kumar Kanodia 1 hour later
Brief Answer: Not heriditary; not transmissible to any body Detailed Answer: Dear Sir, There is no chance of getting your probelm in your future baby. It is not at all transmissible to any body else in including your first child or your surrounding persons. It is not infective as well as heriditary condition. So relieve all your tensions and stress regarding this simple of skin condition. All my best wishes for your family as well future baby. I hope these informations will help you. I will be glad to reply any further queries or if not then can close the query and rate the answer. With regards, Dr Sanjay Kumar Kanodia MD- Dermatology
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