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What does L4-5 posterocentral disc protrusion impinging upon the ventral aspect thesac mean?

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Spine Surgeon
Practicing since : 2002
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MRI L4-5 posterocentral disc protrusion impinging upon the ventral aspect thesac. no neural foraminal compromise.have had pain in lower back for 2 months,also going to pt 4 the same time. slight relief, hurt it lifting heavy pallet. looking for laymans term of this problem thx
Posted Tue, 2 Apr 2013 in Back Pain
 
 
Answered by Dr. Rahul D Chaudhari 43 minutes later
Welcome to XXXXXXX
L4-5 disc prolapse can cause persistent back pain. Its good that there is no nerve compression. The back pain is usually treated with medicine and physiotherapy. Initial few weeks avoid lifting heavy things, prolong sitting, long travels. Regular back muscle exercise and stretching would be helpful in long run.
Few stretching as below-
Lower Back Stretch #1
Lie down on the floor with your back flat to the floor.

Bend both legs and place your feet flat on the floor.

Extend both arms out to each side of your body.

Now slowly drop both knees to the floor to one side until you feel the stretch.

Hold the stretch for 30 seconds and repeat to the other side.
You can repeat this several times for an awesome stretch in your lower back.


Lower Back Stretch #2
Start by lying down on your back.

Bend your left knee and place your foot flat on the floor.

Lift your right leg and lift it up towards the ceiling and grab it with both hands behind the calf or thigh (whichever is more comfortable for you).

Gently pull your leg towards your chest until you feel the stretch.

For a deeper stretch, lift your head up off the floor lifting up towards your extended leg.

Once you feel the stretch in your lower back, hold for 30 seconds.

Return to starting position and repeat several times and then switch sides.

Lower Back Stretch #3
Start by sitting up straight on the floor (do not arch your back).

Extend your right leg straight out in front of you.

Bending your left leg, cross it over your right leg and place your foot flat on the floor.

Take your right elbow and place it on your left knee. Place your right hand out to the side for support.

Now gently twist your body to the left until you feel the stretch. Hold for 30 seconds and repeat on the other side.

I hope this would be helpful. Thanks.
Above answer was peer-reviewed by
 
Follow-up: What does L4-5 posterocentral disc protrusion impinging upon the ventral aspect thesac mean? 18 minutes later
im worried i really need to get back to work.im a ups driver so u know what my job intails.will continue to exercise and try chiropractor. was also told about possible cortosone/steroid shot. is this a problen that can resolve it self with the above practices. and is there a likey time frame. need to get back to work thx for ur help in this matter
 
 
Answered by Dr. Rahul D Chaudhari 9 hours later
I understand your situation. Steroid shots may not work for you. It is usually considered if you have nerve compression or facetal arthropathy. You have a disc problem which is not treated with steroid. I think regular exercise and making your abdominal and back muscle stronger is the key.
Back pain usually get better between 6 weeks to 6 months and varies form patient to patient. This is self limiting problem and will definitely get better if you bring some changes in your routine and at least try not to lift very heavy things for time being. In very few cases if pain persist more than a year then we need to consider doing discography and subsequent disc replacement surgery.Thanks.
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