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What can I expect from a bone scan with "bulging disc at C6-C7 and atypical hemangioma at C3" reading in MRI?

DOCTOR OF THE MONTH - Apr 2014
Apr 2014
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I had a MRI for a nagging disc problem from 15 years ago. The area started hurting agian so I had a MRI. The MRI noted the bulging disc at C6-C7, but it also said something to the effect of 1 CM lession hypo intense T1 and hyper intense on T2 (something like that) @ C3, it then said may be "ATYPICAL HEMANGIOMA" consider bone scan for evaluation. I went to a Neuro and he set up a bone scan for tomorrow....this has me worried sick. In my mind the more they look, the more they will find....what should I expect?
Posted Tue, 7 Jan 2014 in X-ray, Lab tests and Scans
 
 
Answered by Dr. Indu Kumar 1 hour later
Brief Answer: You should go for bone scan. Detailed Answer: Hello XXXX Thanks for writing to XXXXXXX You don't worry at all.You should go for bone scan. Hemangioma are benign abnormal growth of blood vessels and it is the most common incidental finding in MRI spine scan.These lesions are hyperintense(bright) on both T1 and T2 weighted images but in your case it is hypointense (dark) on T1 weighted images and hyperintense(bright)on T2 weighted images. Hypointensity on T1 and hyperintensity on T2 weighted images are also found in bone tumour,metastatic lesions.This has caused confusion and this condition has to be ruled out which is only possible by bone scan.So,you should go for bone scan. Asymptomatic hemangioma doesn't require any treatment whereas symptomatic lesions are treated by vascular embolization and radiotherapy.Surgery may be done if needed. You should consult neurosurgeon after investigations are done. Get well soon. Hope i have answered your query. Further queries are most welcome. Take Care Dr.Indu XXXXXXX
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Follow-up: What can I expect from a bone scan with "bulging disc at C6-C7 and atypical hemangioma at C3" reading in MRI? 23 hours later
I had my bone scan today. It was painless and went quickly. The issue that alarmed me was that they ordered a whole body scan. Why was this?? The issue was a 1 CM lesion on my C3 vertebral body. Another thing that threw me off was at the end of the head to toe scan, the tech moved the scanner and looked at both sides of my neck. Is this due to the C3 lesion position (couldn't they see it from a front to back scan) or is it likely he saw something that needed more attention? Sorry....high anxiety level now!!
 
 
Answered by Dr. Indu Kumar 8 hours later
Brief Answer: Whole body scan is done to see metastatic lesions. Detailed Answer: Hello XXXX Thanks for writing back Whole body scan was advised to see multifocal lesions. If lesions are metastatic in nature, similar lesions may be present at other sites and this can only be seen in whole body scan. Technician had seen you from both sides to confirm alignment.Body should be in neutral position during scan.There is nothing to be worried about and wish for normal reports. Get well soon. Hope i have answered your query. Further queries are most welcome. Take Care Dr.Indu XXXXXXX
Above answer was peer-reviewed by
 
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