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What are the chances of showing the effect of smoking in blood 10 weeks after quitting smoking?

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Practicing since : 1981
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If u quit smoking weed at 27 weeks pregnant would it show in your blood at 37 weeks pregnant and how to speed up the process of getting it out
Posted Tue, 7 Aug 2012 in Drug Abuse
Answered by Dr. Anil Grover 3 hours later
Thank you for writing in.
I am a medical specialist with an additional degree in cardiology.
The simple answer to your question is if quit smoking ten weeks ago will it show in blood is No it will not. But effect of fetus which had occurred would persist; good news is some effects will not occur. There will not be out of ordinary problem in labor and delivery. That is some achievement.

How will smoking affect my baby?

A shortage of oxygen can have devastating effects on your baby's growth and development. On average, smoking during pregnancy doubles the chances that a baby will be born too early or weigh less than 5 1/2 pounds at birth. Smoking also more than doubles the risk of stillbirth. By quitting you have only about 40% risk as compared to a lady who continued to smoke.

Every cigarette you smoke increases the risks to your pregnancy. A few cigarettes a day are safer than a whole pack, but the difference isn't as great as you might think. A smoker's body is especially sensitive to the first doses of nicotine each day, and even just one or two cigarettes will significantly tighten blood vessels. That's why even a "light" habit can have an outsize effect on your baby's health.

How smoking affects your baby:

Weight and size
On average, a pack-a-day habit during pregnancy will shave about a half-pound from a baby's birth weight. Smoking two packs a day throughout your pregnancy could make your baby a full pound or more lighter. While some women may welcome the prospect of delivering a smaller baby, stunting a baby's growth in the womb can have negative consequences that last a lifetime. Baby's organ develop in first 8 weeks so fear some negative effects is still there but at the least that complete risk no longer persisits.

Body and lungs
Undersize babies tend to have underdeveloped bodies. Their lungs may not be ready to work on their own, which means they may spend their first days or weeks attached to a respirator. After they're breathing on their own (or even if they did from the start), these babies may have continuing breathing problems — because of delayed lung development or other adverse effects of nicotine. Children whose mothers smoked during pregnancy are especially vulnerable to asthma, and have double or even triple the risk of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS). Well, chances of having a normal baby have greatly improved but the risk has nnot become zero. Let us hope it has reached closer to zero.

Heart (develops from day 7 to day 56 of conception)

Babies whose mother smoked in the first trimester of pregnancy are more likely to have a heart defect at birth.

In a U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) study published in February 2011, these babies' risk of having certain types of congenital heart defects was 20 to 70 percent higher than it was for babies whose moms didn't smoke. The defects included those that obstruct the flow of blood from the right side of the heart into the lungs (right ventricular outflow tract obstructions) and openings between the upper chambers of the heart (atrial septal defects).

Researchers analyzed data on 2,525 babies who had heart defects at birth and 3,435 healthy babies born in Baltimore and Washington, D.C., between 1981 and 1989.

Brain function
Smoking during pregnancy can have lifelong effects on your baby's brain. Children of pregnant smokers are especially likely to have learning disorders, behavioral problems, and relatively low IQs.
Behind all these grim statistics lies an incredible opportunity: You can give your baby a huge gift by giving up your habit — the sooner the better. Ideally, you should give up smoking before you conceive. For one thing, you'll have an easier time getting pregnant. (Smoking lowers the chance of conceiving during any particular cycle by about 40 percent.) You also won't have to struggle with quitting at a time when you should be thinking about other things, like eating well, exercising, and preparing for your baby's birth. You have given that gift to baby and let us be optimistic that danger is over.

A study published in the August 2009 journal Obstetrics and Gynecology found that expecting moms who quit in the first trimester actually raise their odds of delivering a healthy full-term, full-size baby to about the same as that of a nonsmoker. Moms who quit in the second trimester improved their odds, too, but not as much.

After weeks 14 to 16, fetuses should be greedily putting on weight. If you're still smoking at that stage, your baby's growth will start to lag. But as soon as you quit, your baby will start getting the oxygen he needs to grow. By the time you have your next ultrasound, your doctor should be able to see a significant change in your baby's growth rate. Even if you're smoking at 30 weeks or beyond, you can still give your baby several weeks to put on weight as quickly as possible. It's as easy — and as difficult — as throwing away your cigarettes and never lighting up again.

Good Luck.

With Best Wishes
Dr Anil Grover,
M.B.;B.S, M.D. (Internal Medicine) D.M.(Cardiology)
http://www/ WWW.WWWW.WW
Above answer was peer-reviewed by
Follow-up: What are the chances of showing the effect of smoking in blood 10 weeks after quitting smoking? 4 hours later
I'm not talking about cigarettes I'm talking about marijuana I wanted to no would it be out my blood in 10 weeks if I quit and what are the affects on my baby if I smoked marijuana for 5 years everyday and stopped smoking when I was 27 weeks pregnant would it be out my blood by 37 weeks pregnant
Answered by Dr. Anil Grover 17 minutes later
I am sorry that word "weed" did not hit me in your first question, my apologies for the same.
PROVEN effects of marijuana are limited and effects are based on animal studies and contaminants of the weed one smoked. It is out of your blood at 37 weeks. Development of most of the organ is complete by 26 weeks therefore, whatever effects had to occur chances are they will occur despite quitting. In any case quitting at any stage is far better than continuing.

Smoking marijuana during pregnancy may (there is no difference between may or may not) affect your baby's growth and the development of his nervous system. Studies have shown that children who were exposed to marijuana during pregnancy sometimes have problems focusing their attention and solving problems.

Children of heavy pot users may also have problems with short-term memory, concentration, and judgment. (There's no evidence so far, however, that marijuana use during pregnancy causes attention deficit hyperactivity disorder).

One study even found that young children whose mothers smoked marijuana during pregnancy had a higher risk of leukemia than those whose mothers did not.

What's more, there's no way to know if the pot you're smoking has been laced with other drugs (such as PCP) or contaminated with pesticides, which would put your baby at even higher risk. And using marijuana increases the chance that your baby will have birth defects if you're also drinking alcohol or smoking tobacco.

If you smoked pot before you realized you were pregnant, don't panic. The chance that your baby has been affected is very small. Still, it's important to be honest with your practitioner about your previous use of pot and other recreational drugs. She may want to run some extra tests to be sure your baby is developing normally.
Good Luck. If you have any further question I will be happy to answer it.

With Best Wishes
Dr Anil Grover,
M.B.;B.S, M.D. (Internal Medicine) D.M.(Cardiology)
http://www/ WWW.WWWW.WW
Above answer was peer-reviewed by
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