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TSh level is 24 suggested to have thyroxine. Will taht impact my pregnancy?

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Hi my TSh level is 24 now as per my recent result. And I am pregnant (45 days). Will it impact my child ..? I have suggested to have thyroxine 150 dosage....will TSH will be reduced within few months..?




Posted Fri, 24 May 2013 in Thyroid Problem and Hormonal Problems
 
 
Answered by Dr. Michelle Gibson James 29 minutes later
Hi, thanks for using healthcare magic

The normal upper limit for TSH in pregnancy is 0.1- 2.5mIU/L.

The high TSH indicates that you are hypothyroid which means that the thyroid gland is not making enough thyroid hormone.
It is possible that it can affect the baby but this would only occur if it is not treated appropriately.

The dose that you are being given should cause a decrease in the TSH and should improve the T4 and T3 levels (the thyroid hormones) within a few weeks, if the improvement is not significant your doctor may increase the dose. Persons respond differently to medication so there is no way to anticipate how much of an improvement will occur.

In addition to the thyroid hormone replacement, you may need to start iodine . The american thyroid association recommends that pregnant women is 250 mg a day.

Your doctor may suggest thyroid hormone test every 3 to 4 weeks during the first half of pregnancy and every 6 to 10 weeks after that.

I hope this helps, feel free to ask any other questions
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Follow-up: TSh level is 24 suggested to have thyroxine. Will taht impact my pregnancy? 1 hour later
MY THYROID ANTIBODIES RANGE(ANTI-MOCROSOMAL ANITBODY) : 1: 102,400

WHAT DOES IT MEAN..I GOT THE REPORT NOW, ANY PROBLEM FOR MY CHILD
 
 
Answered by Dr. Michelle Gibson James 3 hours later
Hi

Thyroid antibodies can attack the thyroid gland and prevent it from releasing thyroid hormones, they may be the reason for your hypothyroidism ( low thyroid hormone level)
Your level of thyroid microsomal antibody is increased and is affecting the gland.

It is lucky that this was discovered early in pregnancy. It improves the chances that the baby will be fine once the level is corrected with the medication.
Once you take the medication and the level of thyroid hormone start to rise and stay within normal range then the baby should be ok.

please feel free to ask anything else
Above answer was peer-reviewed by
 
Follow-up: TSh level is 24 suggested to have thyroxine. Will taht impact my pregnancy? 6 hours later
Thank you for your reply, Is Thyroxine 150mg is sufficient for treatment now, or need to increase the dosage.
 
 
Answered by Dr. Michelle Gibson James 17 minutes later
Hi

You can start at this dose, your doctor will do a blood level in a few weeks to determine whether the dose is appropriate for you.
The only way to determine if it is enough is to check your response to it with a blood test because persons respond differently to medication. One dose may be adequate in one person but too high or low in someone else.

Hope this helps. feel free to ask any other questions
Above answer was peer-reviewed by
 
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