Get your Health question answered in 3 easy steps
A Doctor will be with you shortly
Ask a Doctor Now
126 Doctors are Online

Swollen lymph nodes under arms and groin hurts and have sores. Could this be signs of lymphoma?

May 2014
User rating for this question
Very Good
Answered by

Practicing since : 2002
Answered : 6312 Questions
Yes, I have a son whose lymphnodes swell all the time. Under his arms they swell really bad and the ones in his groinhurt so bad it makes him cry! Also his face swells as his hand or foot may do. He has sores that come and go plus more things. Could this be signs of Lymphoma?
Posted Sat, 16 Nov 2013 in Lymphoma
Answered by Dr. Vivek Chail 1 hour later
Brief Answer:
Most likely infective cause, needs clinical check

Detailed Answer:
Thanks for writing in to us.

I have read your query in detail.

Lymph nodes may be found singly or in groups. And they may be as small as the head of a pin or as large as an olive. Groups of lymph nodes can be felt in the neck, groin, and underarms. Lymph nodes generally are not tender or painful. Most lymph nodes in the body cannot be felt.

Lymph nodes often swell in one location when a problem such as an injury, infection, or tumor develops in or near the lymph node. Which lymph nodes are swollen can help identify the problem.

Glands in the armpit (axillary lymph nodes) may swell from an injury or infection to the arm or hand.
The lymph nodes in the groin (femoral or inguinal lymph nodes) may swell from an injury or infection in the foot, leg, groin, or genitals. In rare cases, testicular cancer, lymphoma, or melanoma may cause a lump in this area.

When lymph nodes swell in two or more areas of the body, it is called generalized lymphadenopathy. This may be caused by:

1. Any viral illness, such as measles, rubella, chickenpox (varicella), or mumps.
Mononucleosis (Epstein-Barr virus), which results in fever, sore throat, and fatigue, or cytomegalovirus (CMV), a viral infection that causes symptoms similar to those of mononucleosis.

2. Any bacterial illness, such as strep throat (caused by the streptococcus bacterium) or Lyme disease (a bacterial infection spread by certain types of ticks).

3. Side effects of phenytoin (Dilantin), a medicine used to prevent seizures.

4. Side effects of measles-mumps-rubella (MMR) vaccination.

5. Cancer, such as leukemia, Hodgkin's disease, and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma.

6. Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS), which develops after contracting HIV (human immunodeficiency virus). This virus attacks the immune system, making it difficult for the body to fight off infection and some disease.

7. Syphilis, a sexually transmitted disease.

8. Tuberculosis, a chronic bacterial infection can cause matted lymph nodes.

If the lymph nodes are painful and cause cores, it is less likely to be due to any cancer or lymphoma.

Lymph nodes may remain swollen or firm long after an initial infection is gone.

Treatment for swollen glands focuses on treating the cause. For example, a bacterial infection may be treated with antibiotics, while a viral infection often goes away on its own. If cancer is suspected, a biopsy may be done to confirm the diagnosis.

Any swollen lymph nodes that don't go away or return to normal size over about a month should be checked by your doctor.

I hope this answers your query.
Do write in in case of doubts.

Above answer was peer-reviewed by
Share on Facebook
Share on Twitter
Share on Google+
Question is related to
Medical Procedures
Medical Topics

The user accepted the expert's answer

Ask an Oncologist

© Ebix, Inc. All Rights Reserved.
All the information, content and live chat provided on the site is intended to be for informational purposes only, and not a substitute for professional or medical advice. You should always speak with your doctor before you follow anything that you read on this website. Any health question asked on this site will be visible to the people who browse this site. Hence, the user assumes the responsibility not to divulge any personally identifiable information in the question. Use of this site is subject to our Terms & Conditions
Already Rated.
Your rating:

Ask a Doctor